Logo AND Algorithmique Numérique Distribuée

Public GIT Repository
Don't change doxygen typo for \dontinclude
authornavarro <navarro@caraja.(none)>
Wed, 30 May 2012 11:37:02 +0000 (13:37 +0200)
committernavarro <navarro@caraja.(none)>
Wed, 30 May 2012 11:37:14 +0000 (13:37 +0200)
17 files changed:
doc/Doxyfile.in
doc/bindings.doc
doc/gtut-tour-02-simple.doc
doc/gtut-tour-03-args.doc
doc/gtut-tour-04-callback.doc
doc/gtut-tour-05-globals.doc
doc/gtut-tour-06-logs.doc
doc/gtut-tour-07-timers.doc
doc/gtut-tour-08-exceptions.doc
doc/gtut-tour-09-simpledata.doc
doc/gtut-tour-10-rpc.doc
doc/gtut-tour-11-explicitwait.doc
doc/module-gras.doc
doc/module-msg.doc
include/xbt/config.h
include/xbt/dynar.h
include/xbt/ex.h

index bd4d333..f36aa29 100644 (file)
@@ -781,7 +781,7 @@ EXAMPLE_PATH           = ./ \
 EXAMPLE_PATTERNS       =
 
 # If the EXAMPLE_RECURSIVE tag is set to YES then subdirectories will be
-# searched for input files to be used with the \include or \don'tinclude
+# searched for input files to be used with the \include or \dontinclude
 # commands irrespective of the value of the RECURSIVE tag.
 # Possible values are YES and NO. If left blank NO is used.
 
index a326532..5c25bf9 100644 (file)
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ Actually, the use of lua in Simgrid is quite simple, you have just to follow the
   - loading the platforme/deployment XML file that describe the environment of simulation
   - and … Running the Simulation.
   
-\don'tinclude lua/masterslave/master.lua
+\dontinclude lua/masterslave/master.lua
 \subsection bindings_binding_lua_example_master_slave Master/Slave Example
 
  \li Master Code
@@ -41,13 +41,13 @@ we mainly  use   simgrid.Task.new(task_name,computation_size,communication_size)
         then simgrid.Task.send(task,alias) to send it.
 we use also simgrid.Task.name(task), to get the task's name. 
 
-\don'tinclude lua/masterslave/slave.lua
+\dontinclude lua/masterslave/slave.lua
 \li Slave Code
 \until end_of_slave
 Here, we see the use of simgrid.Task.recv(alias) to receive a task with a specific alias,
 this function return directly the task recevied.
 
-\don'tinclude lua/masterslave/master_slave.lua
+\dontinclude lua/masterslave/master_slave.lua
 \li Set Environmenet and run application
 \until simgrid.clean()
 
index 1bc4dfe..bb5980d 100644 (file)
@@ -22,7 +22,7 @@ Fortunately, such discrepency will be detected in SG.
 
 We won't convey any payload in this lesson, so we just have to give the name
 of message to declare them:
-\don'tinclude 02-simple.c
+\dontinclude 02-simple.c
 \skip gras_msgtype_declare
 \until gras_msgtype_declare
 
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ messages, you have to create a so-called <i>client socket</i>. For this, use
 \ref gras_socket_client with the hostname and the port of the process you
 want to contact as arguments. Our client should simply do:
 
-\don'tinclude 02-simple.c
+\dontinclude 02-simple.c
 \skip socket_client
 \until socket_client
 
@@ -84,7 +84,7 @@ gras_msg_send on the sender side, and \ref gras_msg_wait on the receiver side.
 message, the message type (described by its name), and a pointer to the actual content of the
 message. Since we don't have any payload, this becomes:
 
-\don'tinclude 02-simple.c
+\dontinclude 02-simple.c
 \skip msg_send
 \until msg_send
 
@@ -96,7 +96,7 @@ message you received while the last argument is where to put the payload.
 
 Since our server is willing to wait up to 60 seconds for a message, the
 following will do it:
-\don'tinclude 02-simple.c
+\dontinclude 02-simple.c
 \skip msg_wait
 \until msg_wait
 
index a8ed6c5..33042c2 100644 (file)
@@ -19,7 +19,7 @@ situation.
 In RL, the situation is quite simple: we just have to use the command line
 arguments as we would do in a usual C program. In the server, only change
 concern the opennong of the master socket:
-\don'tinclude 03-args.c
+\dontinclude 03-args.c
 \skip gras_socket_server
 \until gras_socket_server
 
index 5ece140..b23d808 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ speaking about the message we are handling while the second is the payload.
 The callback returns an integer being its error code, just like the "main()"
 function. Here is the actual code of our callback:
 
-\don'tinclude 04-callback.c
+\dontinclude 04-callback.c
 \skip gras_msg_cb_ctx_t 
 \until end_of_callback
 
index 32450ce..11ddb12 100644 (file)
@@ -28,7 +28,7 @@ it with the gras_userdata_* functions (there is only 3 of them ;).
 We will now modify the example to add a "kill" message, and let the server
 loop on incoming messages until it gets such a message. We only need a
 boolean, so the structure is quite simple: 
-\don'tinclude 05-globals.c
+\dontinclude 05-globals.c
 \skip struct
 \until server_data
  
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ helper macro mallocing the space needed by the structure and passing it to
 gras using the latter function. If you go for gras_userdata_set(), you
 should pass it a pointer to your data you want to retrieve afterward.
 
-\don'tinclude 05-globals.c
+\dontinclude 05-globals.c
 \skip userdata_new
 \until userdata_new
 
@@ -49,13 +49,13 @@ defined as being of type server_data_t*.
 
 Once you declared a global that way, retriving this (for example in a
 callback) is really easy:
-\don'tinclude 05-globals.c
+\dontinclude 05-globals.c
 \skip userdata_get
 \until userdata_get
 
 We can now write the callback, which simply retrive the globals and change
 the value of the <tt>kileld</tt> field.
-\don'tinclude 05-globals.c
+\dontinclude 05-globals.c
 \skip kill_cb
 \until end_of_kill_callback
 
index 7055dd7..347abdb 100644 (file)
@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ of channel we want:
 What we want here is a root category (it does not belong to any existing
 channel, for sure), and we want it to be the default one in our file (of
 course, it's the only one).
-\don'tinclude 06-logs.c
+\dontinclude 06-logs.c
 \skip XBT_LOG
 \until XBT_LOG
 
index d584f26..3ad4204 100644 (file)
@@ -52,7 +52,7 @@ first need to add a global to the server too, containing the socket binded
 onto the server (to send messages) and a boolean indicating whether we are
 done or not, just like we did on the server side in \ref
 GRAS_tut_tour_globals. Here is the resulting global structure:
-\don'tinclude 07-timers.c
+\dontinclude 07-timers.c
 \skip client_data
 \until client_data_t
 
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ Desinstalling this is not harder. You tell the action to unschedule, and the
 periodicity at which it was desinstalled (so that the same action can be
 scheduled at different intervals, and each of them be desinstallable
 separately).
-\don'tinclude 07-timers.c
+\dontinclude 07-timers.c
 \skip gras_timer_cancel_repeat
 \until gras_timer_cancel_repeat
 
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ Then comes the delayed action in charge of stopping everything, which should
 be self-explanatory at this point. It could be cancelled before its
 expiration using gras_timer_cancel_delay(), which accepts exactly the same
 kind of arguments than gras_timer_cancel_repeat().
-\don'tinclude 07-timers.c
+\dontinclude 07-timers.c
 \skip client_do_stop
 \until end_of_client_do_stop
 
index a91771d..b9c7e36 100644 (file)
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ have to find from itself. For this, it will try to open socket and send the
 kill message to each ports of the search range. If it manage to close the
 socket after sending the message without being interrupted by an exception,
 it can assume that it killed the server and stop searching.
-\don'tinclude 08-exceptions.c
+\dontinclude 08-exceptions.c
 \skip port=3000
 \until end_of_loop
 
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ To make the game a bit more fun (and to show you what an exception actually
 look like when it's not catched), we add a potential command line argument
 to the server, asking it to cheat and to not open its port within the search
 range but elsewhere:
-\don'tinclude 08-exceptions.c
+\dontinclude 08-exceptions.c
 \skip strcmp
 \until gras_socket_my_port
 \until }
index 21377c0..0b1d2e4 100644 (file)
@@ -204,7 +204,7 @@ differ from node types to node types (the server attach 2 callbacks where
 the client don't attach any). Here is the message declaring function in our
 case:
 
-\don'tinclude 09-simpledata.c
+\dontinclude 09-simpledata.c
 \skip message_declaration(void)
 \until }
 
@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ So, it you want to retrieve a double, you have to cast the pointer using
 <tt>(double*)</tt>, and then dereference the obtained pointer by adding a
 star before the cast. This is what we do here:
 
-\don'tinclude 09-simpledata.c
+\dontinclude 09-simpledata.c
 \skip server_kill_cb
 \until delay
 
index 6591c0f..e06f20e 100644 (file)
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ message. In our example, we accept one string in input, and a long in
 output for the a2i conversion (a=char 2=to i=integer), and the contrary in
 the other direction.
 
-\don'tinclude 10-rpc.c
+\dontinclude 10-rpc.c
 \skip gras_msgtype_declare_rpc
 \until long
 \until string
index 7d3bcd8..a33502a 100644 (file)
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ definition discrepency.
 
 Here, there is no payload attached to the messages.
 
-\don'tinclude 11-explicitwait.c
+\dontinclude 11-explicitwait.c
 \skip message_declaration
 \until }
 
@@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ service, the server stops. This would be a bit difficult to implement
 Here, we will just hardcode that the clients ask 5 times for the token, and
 that there is two clients. This clearly simplify the problem.
 
-\don'tinclude 11-explicitwait.c
+\dontinclude 11-explicitwait.c
 \skip gras_userdata_new
 \until gras_msg_handle
 
index b6ce85f..d3a7587 100644 (file)
        
     <hr>
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/ping/ping_common.c
+    \dontinclude gras/ping/ping_common.c
     
     \section GRAS_ex_ping_common 1) Common code to the client and the server 
     
     
     The module header <tt>ping.h</tt> reads:
     
-    \don'tinclude gras/ping/ping.h
+    \dontinclude gras/ping/ping.h
     \skip include
     \until argv
     \until argv
     (to exchange more complicated types, see \ref GRAS_dd or 
     \ref GRAS_ex_mmrpc for an example).
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/ping/ping_common.c
+    \dontinclude gras/ping/ping_common.c
     \skip register_messages
     \until }
 
     struct definition so that they can be handled properly in GRAS (see the
     \ref GRAS_tut_tour_globals for more info).
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/ping/ping_server.c
+    \dontinclude gras/ping/ping_server.c
     \skip typedef struct
     \until }
     
     This function is quite straightforward, and the inlined comments should
     be enough to understand it.
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/ping/ping_client.c
+    \dontinclude gras/ping/ping_client.c
     \skip client
     \until end_of_client
 
    message to the next node. That is why we have to store all variable in a
    global, as explained in the \ref GRAS_globals section. 
 
-   \don'tinclude examples/gras/mutual_exclusion/simple_token/simple_token.c
+   \dontinclude examples/gras/mutual_exclusion/simple_token/simple_token.c
    \skip typedef
    \until }
    
     This loads the gras header and declare the function's prototypes as well
     as the matrix size.
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc.h
+    \dontinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc.h
     \skip include
     \until argv
     \until argv
     \ref XBT_LOG_NEW_DEFAULT_CATEGORY here and 
     \ref XBT_LOG_EXTERNAL_DEFAULT_CATEGORY in mmrpc_client.c and mmrpc_server.c.
     
-    \don'tinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_common.c
+    \dontinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_common.c
     \skip include
     \until XBT_LOG
 
     \ref XBT_DEFINE_TYPE symbols don't get included here. Likewise, we use 
     \ref XBT_LOG_EXTERNAL_DEFAULT_CATEGORY to get the log category in here.
     
-    \don'tinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_server.c
+    \dontinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_server.c
     \skip define
     \until XBT_LOG
 
     datatype parsing and log categories do work even if we are using several
     files.  
     
-    \don'tinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_client.c
+    \dontinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_client.c
     \skip define
     \until XBT_LOG
 
     This function is quite straightforward, and the inlined comments should
     be enough to understand it.
 
-    \don'tinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_client.c
+    \dontinclude gras/mmrpc/mmrpc_client.c
     \skip argv
     \until end_of_client
 
      - \ref GRAS_ex_timer_repeat
      - \ref GRAS_ex_timer_main
 
-    \don'tinclude timer.c
+    \dontinclude timer.c
     
     \section GRAS_ex_timer_decl   1. Declarations and headers
     \skip include
index ab70142..b4ffe38 100644 (file)
@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ an external description of the deployment.
 
 <hr> 
 
-\don'tinclude msg/icomms/peer.c
+\dontinclude msg/icomms/peer.c
 
 \section MSG_ext_icomms_code Code of the application
 
@@ -272,7 +272,7 @@ This initializes MSG, runs a simulation, and free all data-structures created by
 
 \until end_of_main
 
-\don'tinclude msg/icomms/peer2.c
+\dontinclude msg/icomms/peer2.c
 
 \section MSG_ext_icomms_fct_Waitall Waitall function for sender
 
@@ -287,13 +287,13 @@ The MSG_comm_waitany() function return the place of the first message send or re
 
 \subsection MSG_ext_icomms_fct_Waitany_sender From a sender
 We can use this function to wait all sent messages.
-\don'tinclude msg/icomms/peer3.c
+\dontinclude msg/icomms/peer3.c
 \skipline Sender function
 \until end_of_sender
 
 \subsection MSG_ext_icomms_fct_Waitany_receiver From a receiver
 We can also wait for the arrival of all messages.
-\don'tinclude msg/icomms/peer3.c
+\dontinclude msg/icomms/peer3.c
 \skipline Receiver function
 \until end_of_receiver
 
@@ -321,7 +321,7 @@ and an external description of the deployment.
  
 <hr> 
 
-\don'tinclude msg/masterslave/masterslave_forwarder.c
+\dontinclude msg/masterslave/masterslave_forwarder.c
 
 \section MSG_ext_ms_code Code of the application
 
@@ -419,7 +419,7 @@ This initializes MSG, runs a simulation, and free all data-structures created by
        - \ref MSG_ext_ms_platform
        
        
-      \don'tinclude lua/masterslave/master_slave.lua
+      \dontinclude lua/masterslave/master_slave.lua
       
       \section MSG_ext_ms_code_lua Code of the application
       
@@ -472,7 +472,7 @@ This initializes MSG, runs a simulation, and free all data-structures created by
        - \ref MSG_ext_ms_core_lua
        
        
-      \don'tinclude lua/console/master_slave_bypass.lua
+      \dontinclude lua/console/master_slave_bypass.lua
       
       \section MSG_ext_ms_code_lua Code of the application
       
index 5cf4b53..023f70a 100644 (file)
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ SG_BEGIN_DECL()
  *
  *  \section XBT_cfg_ex Example of use
  *
- *  \don'tinclude config.c
+ *  \dontinclude config.c
  *
  *  First, let's create a configuration set with some registered variables.
  *  This must be done by the configurable library before the user interactions.
index 172ff10..87b501c 100644 (file)
@@ -27,7 +27,7 @@ SG_BEGIN_DECL()
   * structure creation (of type void_f_ppvoid_t or void_f_pvoid_t).
   *
   * \section XBT_dynar_exscal Example with scalar
-  * \don'tinclude dynar.c
+  * \dontinclude dynar.c
   *
   * \skip Vars_decl
   * \skip dyn
index dfab9c2..b7903c1 100644 (file)
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ __ex_mctx_struct} __ex_mctx_t;
  * following code which shows some pitfalls and contains many errors (assuming
  * a mallocex() function which throws an exception if malloc(3) fails):
  *
- * \don'tinclude ex.c
+ * \dontinclude ex.c
  * \skip BAD_EXAMPLE
  * \until end_of_bad_example
  *