Logo AND Algorithmique Numérique Distribuée

Public GIT Repository
ab4db6d1a0a2f24e9fe5135b78924c36799186d4
[simgrid.git] / include / simgrid / s4u / Mailbox.hpp
1 /* Copyright (c) 2006-2018. The SimGrid Team. All rights reserved.          */
2
3 /* This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
4  * under the terms of the license (GNU LGPL) which comes with this package. */
5
6 #ifndef SIMGRID_S4U_MAILBOX_HPP
7 #define SIMGRID_S4U_MAILBOX_HPP
8
9 #include <xbt/string.hpp>
10 #include <simgrid/s4u/Actor.hpp>
11
12 #include <string>
13
14 namespace simgrid {
15 namespace s4u {
16
17 /** @brief Mailboxes: Network rendez-vous points.
18  *  @ingroup s4u_api
19  *
20  * @tableofcontents
21  *
22  * @section s4u_mb_what What are mailboxes
23  *
24  * Rendez-vous point for network communications, similar to URLs on
25  * which you could post and retrieve data. Actually, the mailboxes are
26  * not involved in the communication once it starts, but only to find
27  * the contact with which you want to communicate.
28
29  * Here are some mechanisms similar to the mailbox in other
30  * communication systems: The phone number, which allows the caller to
31  * find the receiver. The twitter hashtag, which help senders and
32  * receivers to find each others. In TCP, the pair {host name, host
33  * port} to which you can connect to find your interlocutor. In HTTP,
34  * URLs through which the clients can connect to the servers.
35  *
36  * One big difference with most of these systems is that usually, no
37  * actor is the exclusive owner of a mailbox, neither in sending nor
38  * in receiving. Many actors can send into and/or receive from the
39  * same mailbox.  This is a big difference to the socket ports for
40  * example, that are definitely exclusive in receiving.
41  *
42  * A big difference with twitter hashtags is that SimGrid does not
43  * offer easy support to broadcast a given message to many
44  * receivers. So that would be like a twitter tag where each message
45  * is consumed by the first coming receiver.
46  *
47  * The mailboxes are not located on the network, and you can access
48  * them without any latency. The network delay are only related to the
49  * location of the sender and receiver once the match between them is
50  * done on the mailbox. This is just like the phone number that you
51  * can use locally, and the geographical distance only comes into play
52  * once you start the communication by dialling this number.
53  *
54  * @section s4u_mb_howto How to use mailboxes?
55  *
56  * Any existing mailbox can be retrieve from its name (which are
57  * unique strings, just like with twitter tags). This results in a
58  * versatile mechanism that can be used to build many different
59  * situations.
60  *
61  * For something close to classical socket communications, use
62  * "hostname:port" as mailbox names, and make sure that only one actor
63  * reads into that mailbox. It's hard to build a prefectly realistic
64  * model of the TCP sockets, but most of the time, this system is too
65  * cumbersome for your simulations anyway. You probably want something
66  * simpler, that turns our to be easy to build with the mailboxes.
67  *
68  * Many SimGrid examples use a sort of yellow page system where the
69  * mailbox names are the name of the service (such as "worker",
70  * "master" or "reducer"). That way, you don't have to know where your
71  * peer is located to contact it. You don't even need its name. Its
72  * function is enough for that. This also gives you some sort of load
73  * balancing for free if more than one actor pulls from the mailbox:
74  * the first relevant actor that can deal with the request will handle
75  * it.
76  *
77  * @section s4u_mb_matching How are sends and receives matched?
78  *
79  * The matching algorithm is as simple as a first come, first
80  * serve. When a new send arrives, it matches the oldest enqueued
81  * receive. If no receive is currently enqueued, then the incomming
82  * send is enqueued. As you can see, the mailbox cannot contain both
83  * send and receive requests: all enqueued requests must be of the
84  * same sort.
85  *
86  * @section s4u_mb_receiver Declaring a receiving actor
87  *
88  * The last twist is that by default in the simulator, the data starts
89  * to be exchanged only when both the sender and the receiver are
90  * declared while in real systems (such as TCP or MPI), the data
91  * starts to flow as soon as the sender posts it, even if the receiver
92  * did not post its recv() yet. This can obviously lead to bad
93  * simulation timings, as the simulated communications do not start at
94  * the exact same time than the real ones.
95  *
96  * If the simulation timings are very important to you, you can
97  * declare a specific receiver to a given mailbox (with the function
98  * setReceiver()). That way, any send() posted to that mailbox will
99  * start as soon as possible, and the data will already be there on
100  * the receiver host when the receiver actor posts its receive().
101  *
102  * @section s4u_mb_api The API
103  */
104 class XBT_PUBLIC Mailbox {
105   friend Comm;
106   friend simgrid::kernel::activity::MailboxImpl;
107
108   simgrid::kernel::activity::MailboxImpl* pimpl_;
109
110   explicit Mailbox(kernel::activity::MailboxImpl * mbox) : pimpl_(mbox) {}
111
112   /** private function to manage the mailboxes' lifetime (see @ref s4u_raii) */
113   friend void intrusive_ptr_add_ref(Mailbox*) {}
114   /** private function to manage the mailboxes' lifetime (see @ref s4u_raii) */
115   friend void intrusive_ptr_release(Mailbox*) {}
116 public:
117   /** private function, do not use. FIXME: make me protected */
118   kernel::activity::MailboxImpl* get_impl() { return pimpl_; }
119
120   /** @brief Retrieves the name of that mailbox as a C++ string */
121   const simgrid::xbt::string& get_name() const;
122   /** @brief Retrieves the name of that mailbox as a C string */
123   const char* get_cname() const;
124
125   /** Retrieve the mailbox associated to the given C string */
126   static MailboxPtr by_name(const char* name);
127
128   /** Retrieve the mailbox associated to the given C++ string */
129   static MailboxPtr by_name(std::string name);
130
131   /** Returns whether the mailbox contains queued communications */
132   bool empty();
133
134   /** Check if there is a communication going on in a mailbox. */
135   bool listen();
136
137   /** Gets the first element in the queue (without dequeuing it), or nullptr if none is there */
138   smx_activity_t front();
139
140   /** Declare that the specified actor is a permanent receiver on that mailbox
141    *
142    * It means that the communications sent to this mailbox will start flowing to
143    * its host even before he does a recv(). This models the real behavior of TCP
144    * and MPI communications, amongst other.
145    */
146   void set_receiver(ActorPtr actor);
147
148   /** Return the actor declared as permanent receiver, or nullptr if none **/
149   ActorPtr get_receiver();
150
151   /** Creates (but don't start) a data emission to that mailbox */
152   CommPtr put_init();
153   /** Creates (but don't start) a data emission to that mailbox */
154   CommPtr put_init(void* data, uint64_t simulated_size_in_bytes);
155   /** Creates and start a data emission to that mailbox */
156   CommPtr put_async(void* data, uint64_t simulated_size_in_bytes);
157
158   /** Blocking data emission */
159   void put(void* payload, uint64_t simulated_size_in_bytes);
160   /** Blocking data emission with timeout */
161   void put(void* payload, uint64_t simulated_size_in_bytes, double timeout);
162
163   /** Creates (but don't start) a data reception onto that mailbox */
164   CommPtr get_init();
165   /** Creates and start an async data reception to that mailbox */
166   CommPtr get_async(void** data);
167
168   /** Blocking data reception */
169   void* get(); // FIXME: make a typed template version
170   /** Blocking data reception with timeout */
171   void* get(double timeout);
172
173   // Deprecated functions
174   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::set_receiver()") void setReceiver(ActorPtr actor)
175   {
176     set_receiver(actor);
177   }
178   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::get_receiver()") ActorPtr getReceiver() { return get_receiver(); }
179   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::get_name()") const simgrid::xbt::string& getName() const
180   {
181     return get_name();
182   }
183   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::get_cname()") const char* getCname() const { return get_cname(); }
184   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::get_impl()") kernel::activity::MailboxImpl* getImpl()
185   {
186     return get_impl();
187   }
188   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::by_name()") static MailboxPtr byName(const char* name)
189   {
190     return by_name(name);
191   }
192   XBT_ATTRIB_DEPRECATED_v323("Please use Mailbox::by_name()") static MailboxPtr byName(std::string name)
193   {
194     return by_name(name);
195   }
196 };
197
198 }} // namespace simgrid::s4u
199
200 #endif /* SIMGRID_S4U_MAILBOX_HPP */