Logo AND Algorithmique Numérique Distribuée

Public GIT Repository
6abd7455fa0ffb3af119f575547af5205c337f92
[simgrid.git] / doc / doxygen / options.doc
1 /*! \page options Simgrid options and configurations
2
3 A number of options can be given at runtime to change the default
4 SimGrid behavior. For a complete list of all configuration options
5 accepted by the SimGrid version used in your simulator, simply pass
6 the --help configuration flag to your program. If some of the options
7 are not documented on this page, this is a bug that you should please
8 report so that we can fix it. Note that some of the options presented
9 here may not be available in your simulators, depending on the 
10 @ref install_src_config "compile-time options" that you used.
11
12 \section options_using Passing configuration options to the simulators
13
14 There is several way to pass configuration options to the simulators.
15 The most common way is to use the \c --cfg command line argument. For
16 example, to set the item \c Item to the value \c Value, simply
17 type the following: \verbatim
18 my_simulator --cfg=Item:Value (other arguments)
19 \endverbatim
20
21 Several \c `--cfg` command line arguments can naturally be used. If you
22 need to include spaces in the argument, don't forget to quote the
23 argument. You can even escape the included quotes (write \' for ' if
24 you have your argument between ').
25
26 Another solution is to use the \c \<config\> tag in the platform file. The
27 only restriction is that this tag must occure before the first
28 platform element (be it \c \<AS\>, \c \<cluster\>, \c \<peer\> or whatever).
29 The \c \<config\> tag takes an \c id attribute, but it is currently
30 ignored so you don't really need to pass it. The important par is that
31 within that tag, you can pass one or several \c \<prop\> tags to specify
32 the configuration to use. For example, setting \c Item to \c Value
33 can be done by adding the following to the beginning of your platform
34 file: 
35 \verbatim
36 <config>
37   <prop id="Item" value="Value"/>
38 </config>
39 \endverbatim
40
41 A last solution is to pass your configuration directly using the C
42 interface. If you happen to use the MSG interface, this is very easy
43 with the MSG_config() function. If you do not use MSG, that's a bit
44 more complex, as you have to mess with the internal configuration set
45 directly as follows. Check the \ref XBT_config "relevant page" for
46 details on all the functions you can use in this context, \c
47 _sg_cfg_set being the only configuration set currently used in
48 SimGrid. 
49
50 @code
51 #include <xbt/config.h>
52
53 extern xbt_cfg_t _sg_cfg_set;
54
55 int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
56      SD_init(&argc, argv);
57
58      /* Prefer MSG_config() if you use MSG!! */
59      xbt_cfg_set_parse(_sg_cfg_set,"Item:Value");
60
61      // Rest of your code
62 }
63 @endcode
64
65 \section options_model Configuring the platform models
66
67 \subsection options_model_select Selecting the platform models
68
69 SimGrid comes with several network and CPU models built in, and you
70 can change the used model at runtime by changing the passed
71 configuration. The three main configuration items are given below.
72 For each of these items, passing the special \c help value gives
73 you a short description of all possible values. Also, \c --help-models
74 should provide information about all models for all existing resources.
75    - \b network/model: specify the used network model
76    - \b cpu/model: specify the used CPU model
77    - \b workstation/model: specify the used workstation model
78
79 As of writting, the accepted network models are the following. Over
80 the time new models can be added, and some experimental models can be
81 removed; check the values on your simulators for an uptodate
82 information. Note that the CM02 model is described in the research report
83 <a href="ftp://ftp.ens-lyon.fr/pub/LIP/Rapports/RR/RR2002/RR2002-40.ps.gz">A
84 Network Model for Simulation of Grid Application</a> while LV08 is
85 described in
86 <a href="http://mescal.imag.fr/membres/arnaud.legrand/articles/simutools09.pdf">Accuracy Study and Improvement of Network Simulation in the SimGrid Framework</a>.
87
88   - \b LV08 (default one): Realistic network analytic model
89     (slow-start modeled by multiplying latency by 10.4, bandwidth by
90     .92; bottleneck sharing uses a payload of S=8775 for evaluating RTT)
91   - \b Constant: Simplistic network model where all communication
92     take a constant time (one second). This model provides the lowest
93     realism, but is (marginally) faster.
94   - \b SMPI: Realistic network model specifically tailored for HPC
95     settings (accurate modeling of slow start with correction factors on
96     three intervals: < 1KiB, < 64 KiB, >= 64 KiB). See also \ref
97     options_model_network_coefs "this section" for more info.
98   - \b IB: Realistic network model specifically tailored for HPC
99     settings with InfiniBand networks (accurate modeling contention 
100     behavior, based on the model explained in 
101     http://mescal.imag.fr/membres/jean-marc.vincent/index.html/PhD/Vienne.pdf). 
102     See also \ref options_model_network_coefs "this section" for more info.
103   - \b CM02: Legacy network analytic model (Very similar to LV08, but
104     without corrective factors. The timings of small messages are thus
105     poorly modeled)
106   - \b Reno: Model from Steven H. Low using lagrange_solve instead of
107     lmm_solve (experts only; check the code for more info).
108   - \b Reno2: Model from Steven H. Low using lagrange_solve instead of
109     lmm_solve (experts only; check the code for more info).
110   - \b Vegas: Model from Steven H. Low using lagrange_solve instead of
111     lmm_solve (experts only; check the code for more info).
112
113 If you compiled SimGrid accordingly, you can use packet-level network
114 simulators as network models (see \ref pls). In that case, you have
115 two extra models, described below, and some \ref options_pls "specific
116 additional configuration flags".
117   - \b GTNets: Network pseudo-model using the GTNets simulator instead
118     of an analytic model
119   - \b NS3: Network pseudo-model using the NS3 tcp model instead of an
120     analytic model
121
122 Concerning the CPU, we have only one model for now:
123   - \b Cas01: Simplistic CPU model (time=size/power)
124
125 The workstation concept is the aggregation of a CPU with a network
126 card. Three models exists, but actually, only 2 of them are
127 interesting. The "compound" one is simply due to the way our internal
128 code is organized, and can easily be ignored. So at the end, you have
129 two workstation models: The default one allows to aggregate an
130 existing CPU model with an existing network model, but does not allow
131 parallel tasks because these beasts need some collaboration between
132 the network and CPU model. That is why, ptask_07 is used by default
133 when using SimDag.
134   - \b default: Default workstation model. Currently, CPU:Cas01 and
135     network:LV08 (with cross traffic enabled)
136   - \b compound: Workstation model that is automatically chosen if
137     you change the network and CPU models
138   - \b ptask_L07: Workstation model somehow similar to Cas01+CM02 but
139     allowing parallel tasks
140
141 \subsection options_model_optim Optimization level of the platform models
142
143 The network and CPU models that are based on lmm_solve (that
144 is, all our analytical models) accept specific optimization
145 configurations.
146   - items \b network/optim and \b CPU/optim (both default to 'Lazy'):
147     - \b Lazy: Lazy action management (partial invalidation in lmm +
148       heap in action remaining).
149     - \b TI: Trace integration. Highly optimized mode when using
150       availability traces (only available for the Cas01 CPU model for
151       now).
152     - \b Full: Full update of remaining and variables. Slow but may be
153       useful when debugging.
154   - items \b network/maxmin_selective_update and
155     \b cpu/maxmin_selective_update: configure whether the underlying
156     should be lazily updated or not. It should have no impact on the
157     computed timings, but should speed up the computation.
158
159 It is still possible to disable the \c maxmin_selective_update feature
160 because it can reveal counter-productive in very specific scenarios
161 where the interaction level is high. In particular, if all your
162 communication share a given backbone link, you should disable it:
163 without \c maxmin_selective_update, every communications are updated
164 at each step through a simple loop over them. With that feature
165 enabled, every communications will still get updated in this case
166 (because of the dependency induced by the backbone), but through a
167 complicated pattern aiming at following the actual dependencies.
168
169 \subsection options_model_precision Numerical precision of the platform models
170
171 The analytical models handle a lot of floating point values. It is
172 possible to change the epsilon used to update and compare them through
173 the \b maxmin/precision item (default value: 0.00001). Changing it
174 may speedup the simulation by discarding very small actions, at the
175 price of a reduced numerical precision.
176
177 \subsection options_model_nthreads Parallel threads for model updates
178
179 By default, Surf computes the analytical models sequentially to share their
180 resources and update their actions. It is possible to run them in parallel,
181 using the \b surf/nthreads item (default value: 1). If you use a
182 negative or null value, the amount of available cores is automatically
183 detected  and used instead.
184
185 Depending on the workload of the models and their complexity, you may get a
186 speedup or a slowdown because of the synchronization costs of threads.
187
188 \subsection options_model_network Configuring the Network model
189
190 \subsubsection options_model_network_gamma Maximal TCP window size
191
192 The analytical models need to know the maximal TCP window size to take
193 the TCP congestion mechanism into account. This is set to 20000 by
194 default, but can be changed using the \b network/TCP_gamma item.
195
196 On linux, this value can be retrieved using the following
197 commands. Both give a set of values, and you should use the last one,
198 which is the maximal size.\verbatim
199 cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_rmem # gives the sender window
200 cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/tcp_wmem # gives the receiver window
201 \endverbatim
202
203 \subsubsection options_model_network_coefs Corrective simulation factors
204
205 These factors allow to betterly take the slow start into account.
206 The corresponding values were computed through data fitting one the
207 timings of packet-level simulators. You should not change these values
208 unless you are really certain of what you are doing. See
209 <a href="http://mescal.imag.fr/membres/arnaud.legrand/articles/simutools09.pdf">Accuracy Study and Improvement of Network Simulation in the SimGrid Framework</a>
210 for more informations about these coeficients.
211
212 If you are using the SMPI model, these correction coeficients are
213 themselves corrected by constant values depending on the size of the
214 exchange. Again, only hardcore experts should bother about this fact.
215
216 InfiniBand network behavior can be modeled through 3 parameters, as explained in
217 http://mescal.imag.fr/membres/jean-marc.vincent/index.html/PhD/Vienne.pdf . These
218 factors can be changed through option smpi/IB_penalty_factors:"βe;βs;γs". By 
219 default SMPI uses factors computed one Stampede cluster from TACC, with optimal
220 deployment of processes on nodes.
221
222 \subsubsection options_model_network_crosstraffic Simulating cross-traffic
223
224 As of SimGrid v3.7, cross-traffic effects can be taken into account in
225 analytical simulations. It means that ongoing and incoming
226 communication flows are treated independently. In addition, the LV08
227 model adds 0.05 of usage on the opposite direction for each new
228 created flow. This can be useful to simulate some important TCP
229 phenomena such as ack compression.
230
231 For that to work, your platform must have two links for each
232 pair of interconnected hosts. An example of usable platform is
233 available in <tt>examples/msg/gtnets/crosstraffic-p.xml</tt>.
234
235 This is activated through the \b network/crosstraffic item, that
236 can be set to 0 (disable this feature) or 1 (enable it).
237
238 Note that with the default workstation model this option is activated by default.
239
240 \subsubsection options_model_network_coord Coordinated-based network models
241
242 When you want to use network coordinates, as it happens when you use
243 an \<AS\> in your platform file with \c Vivaldi as a routing, you must
244 set the \b network/coordinates to \c yes so that all mandatory
245 initialization are done in the simulator.
246
247 \subsubsection options_model_network_sendergap Simulating sender gap
248
249 (this configuration item is experimental and may change or disapear)
250
251 It is possible to specify a timing gap between consecutive emission on
252 the same network card through the \b network/sender_gap item. This
253 is still under investigation as of writting, and the default value is
254 to wait 10 microseconds (1e-5 seconds) between emissions.
255
256 \subsubsection options_model_network_asyncsend Simulating asyncronous send
257
258 (this configuration item is experimental and may change or disapear)
259
260 It is possible to specify that messages below a certain size will be sent 
261 as soon as the call to MPI_Send is issued, without waiting for the 
262 correspondant receive. This threshold can be configured through the 
263 \b smpi/async_small_thres item. The default value is 0. This behavior can also be 
264 manually set for MSG mailboxes, by setting the receiving mode of the mailbox 
265 with a call to \ref MSG_mailbox_set_async . For MSG, all messages sent to this 
266 mailbox will have this behavior, so consider using two mailboxes if needed. 
267
268 This value needs to be smaller than or equals to the threshold set at 
269 \ref options_model_smpi_detached , because asynchronous messages are 
270 meant to be detached as well.
271
272 \subsubsection options_pls Configuring packet-level pseudo-models
273
274 When using the packet-level pseudo-models, several specific
275 configuration flags are provided to configure the associated tools.
276 There is by far not enough such SimGrid flags to cover every aspects
277 of the associated tools, since we only added the items that we
278 needed ourselves. Feel free to request more items (or even better:
279 provide patches adding more items).
280
281 When using NS3, the only existing item is \b ns3/TcpModel,
282 corresponding to the ns3::TcpL4Protocol::SocketType configuration item
283 in NS3. The only valid values (enforced on the SimGrid side) are
284 'NewReno' or 'Reno' or 'Tahoe'.
285
286 When using GTNeTS, two items exist:
287  - \b gtnets/jitter, that is a double value to oscillate
288    the link latency, uniformly in random interval
289    [-latency*gtnets_jitter,latency*gtnets_jitter). It defaults to 0.
290  - \b gtnets/jitter_seed, the positive seed used to reproduce jitted
291    results. Its value must be in [1,1e8] and defaults to 10.
292
293 \section options_modelchecking Configuring the Model-Checking
294
295 To enable the experimental SimGrid model-checking support the program should
296 be executed with the command line argument
297 \verbatim
298 --cfg=model-check:1
299 \endverbatim
300 Safety properties are expressed as assertions using the function
301 \verbatim
302 void MC_assert(int prop);
303 \endverbatim
304
305 \subsection options_modelchecking_liveness Specifying a liveness property
306
307 If you want to specify liveness properties (beware, that's
308 experimental), you have to pass them on the command line, specifying
309 the name of the file containing the property, as formated by the
310 ltl2ba program.
311
312 \verbatim
313 --cfg=model-check/property:<filename>
314 \endverbatim
315
316 Of course, specifying a liveness property enables the model-checking
317 so that you don't have to give <tt>--cfg=model-check:1</tt> in
318 addition.
319
320 \subsection options_modelchecking_steps Going for stateful verification
321
322 By default, the system is backtracked to its initial state to explore
323 another path instead of backtracking to the exact step before the fork
324 that we want to explore (this is called stateless verification). This
325 is done this way because saving intermediate states can rapidly
326 exhaust the available memory. If you want, you can change the value of
327 the <tt>model-check/checkpoint</tt> variable. For example, the
328 following configuration will ask to take a checkpoint every step.
329 Beware, this will certainly explode your memory. Larger values are
330 probably better, make sure to experiment a bit to find the right
331 setting for your specific system.
332
333 \verbatim
334 --cfg=model-check/checkpoint:1
335 \endverbatim
336
337 Of course, specifying this option enables the model-checking so that
338 you don't have to give <tt>--cfg=model-check:1</tt> in addition.
339
340 \subsection options_modelchecking_reduction Specifying the kind of reduction
341
342 The main issue when using the model-checking is the state space
343 explosion. To counter that problem, several exploration reduction
344 techniques can be used. There is unfortunately no silver bullet here,
345 and the most efficient reduction techniques cannot be applied to any
346 properties. In particular, the DPOR method cannot be applied on
347 liveness properties since it may break some cycles in the exploration
348 that are important to the property validity.
349
350 \verbatim
351 --cfg=model-check/reduction:<technique>
352 \endverbatim
353
354 For now, this configuration variable can take 2 values:
355  * none: Do not apply any kind of reduction (mandatory for now for
356    liveness properties)
357  * dpor: Apply Dynamic Partial Ordering Reduction. Only valid if you
358    verify local safety properties.
359
360 Of course, specifying a reduction technique enables the model-checking
361 so that you don't have to give <tt>--cfg=model-check:1</tt> in
362 addition.
363
364 \subsection options_mc_perf Performance considerations for the model checker
365
366 The size of the stacks can have a huge impact on the memory
367 consumption when using model-checking. Currently each snapshot, will
368 save a copy of the whole stack and not only of the part which is
369 really meaningful: you should expect the contribution of the memory
370 consumption of the snapshots to be \f$ \mbox{number of processes}
371 \times \mbox{stack size} \times \mbox{number of states} \f$.
372
373 However, when compiled against the model checker, the stacks are not
374 protected with guards: if the stack size is too small for your
375 application, the stack will silently overflow on other parts of the
376 memory.
377
378 \section options_virt Configuring the User Process Virtualization
379
380 \subsection options_virt_factory Selecting the virtualization factory
381
382 In SimGrid, the user code is virtualized in a specific mecanism
383 allowing the simulation kernel to control its execution: when a user
384 process requires a blocking action (such as sending a message), it is
385 interrupted, and only gets released when the simulated clock reaches
386 the point where the blocking operation is done.
387
388 In SimGrid, the containers in which user processes are virtualized are
389 called contexts. Several context factory are provided, and you can
390 select the one you want to use with the \b contexts/factory
391 configuration item. Some of the following may not exist on your
392 machine because of portability issues. In any case, the default one
393 should be the most effcient one (please report bugs if the
394 auto-detection fails for you). They are sorted here from the slowest
395 to the most effient:
396  - \b thread: very slow factory using full featured threads (either
397    pthreads or windows native threads)
398  - \b ucontext: fast factory using System V contexts (or a portability
399    layer of our own on top of Windows fibers)
400  - \b raw: amazingly fast factory using a context switching mecanism
401    of our own, directly implemented in assembly (only available for x86
402    and amd64 platforms for now)
403
404 The only reason to change this setting is when the debugging tools get
405 fooled by the optimized context factories. Threads are the most
406 debugging-friendly contextes, as they allow to set breakpoints anywhere with gdb
407  and visualize backtraces for all processes, in order to debug concurrency issues.
408 Valgrind is also more comfortable with threads, but it should be usable with all factories.
409
410 \subsection options_virt_stacksize Adapting the used stack size
411
412 Each virtualized used process is executed using a specific system
413 stack. The size of this stack has a huge impact on the simulation
414 scalability, but its default value is rather large. This is because
415 the error messages that you get when the stack size is too small are
416 rather disturbing: this leads to stack overflow (overwriting other
417 stacks), leading to segfaults with corrupted stack traces.
418
419 If you want to push the scalability limits of your code, you might
420 want to reduce the \b contexts/stack_size item. Its default value
421 is 8192 (in KiB), while our Chord simulation works with stacks as small
422 as 16 KiB, for example. For the thread factory, the default value 
423 is the one of the system, if it is too large/small, it has to be set 
424 with this parameter.
425
426 The operating system should only allocate memory for the pages of the
427 stack which are actually used and you might not need to use this in
428 most cases. However, this setting is very important when using the
429 model checker (see \ref options_mc_perf).
430
431 In some cases, no stack guard page is used and the stack will silently
432 overflow on other parts of the memory if the stack size is too small
433 for your application. This happens :
434
435 - on Windows systems;
436 - when the model checker is enabled;
437 - when stack guard pages are explicitely disabled (see \ref  options_perf_guard_size).
438
439 \subsection options_virt_parallel Running user code in parallel
440
441 Parallel execution of the user code is only considered stable in
442 SimGrid v3.7 and higher. It is described in
443 <a href="http://hal.inria.fr/inria-00602216/">INRIA RR-7653</a>.
444
445 If you are using the \c ucontext or \c raw context factories, you can
446 request to execute the user code in parallel. Several threads are
447 launched, each of them handling as much user contexts at each run. To
448 actiave this, set the \b contexts/nthreads item to the amount of
449 cores that you have in your computer (or lower than 1 to have 
450 the amount of cores auto-detected).
451
452 Even if you asked several worker threads using the previous option,
453 you can request to start the parallel execution (and pay the
454 associated synchronization costs) only if the potential parallelism is
455 large enough. For that, set the \b contexts/parallel_threshold
456 item to the minimal amount of user contexts needed to start the
457 parallel execution. In any given simulation round, if that amount is
458 not reached, the contexts will be run sequentially directly by the
459 main thread (thus saving the synchronization costs). Note that this
460 option is mainly useful when the grain of the user code is very fine,
461 because our synchronization is now very efficient.
462
463 When parallel execution is activated, you can choose the
464 synchronization schema used with the \b contexts/synchro item,
465 which value is either:
466  - \b futex: ultra optimized synchronisation schema, based on futexes
467    (fast user-mode mutexes), and thus only available on Linux systems.
468    This is the default mode when available.
469  - \b posix: slow but portable synchronisation using only POSIX
470    primitives.
471  - \b busy_wait: not really a synchronisation: the worker threads
472    constantly request new contexts to execute. It should be the most
473    efficient synchronisation schema, but it loads all the cores of your
474    machine for no good reason. You probably prefer the other less
475    eager schemas.
476
477 \section options_tracing Configuring the tracing subsystem
478
479 The \ref tracing "tracing subsystem" can be configured in several
480 different ways depending on the nature of the simulator (MSG, SimDag,
481 SMPI) and the kind of traces that need to be obtained. See the \ref
482 tracing_tracing_options "Tracing Configuration Options subsection" to
483 get a detailed description of each configuration option.
484
485 We detail here a simple way to get the traces working for you, even if
486 you never used the tracing API.
487
488
489 - Any SimGrid-based simulator (MSG, SimDag, SMPI, ...) and raw traces:
490 \verbatim
491 --cfg=tracing:yes --cfg=tracing/uncategorized:yes --cfg=triva/uncategorized:uncat.plist
492 \endverbatim
493     The first parameter activates the tracing subsystem, the second
494     tells it to trace host and link utilization (without any
495     categorization) and the third creates a graph configuration file
496     to configure Triva when analysing the resulting trace file.
497
498 - MSG or SimDag-based simulator and categorized traces (you need to declare categories and classify your tasks according to them)
499 \verbatim
500 --cfg=tracing:yes --cfg=tracing/categorized:yes --cfg=triva/categorized:cat.plist
501 \endverbatim
502     The first parameter activates the tracing subsystem, the second
503     tells it to trace host and link categorized utilization and the
504     third creates a graph configuration file to configure Triva when
505     analysing the resulting trace file.
506
507 - SMPI simulator and traces for a space/time view:
508 \verbatim
509 smpirun -trace ...
510 \endverbatim
511     The <i>-trace</i> parameter for the smpirun script runs the
512 simulation with --cfg=tracing:yes and --cfg=tracing/smpi:yes. Check the
513 smpirun's <i>-help</i> parameter for additional tracing options.
514
515 Sometimes you might want to put additional information on the trace to
516 correctly identify them later, or to provide data that can be used to
517 reproduce an experiment. You have two ways to do that:
518
519 - Add a string on top of the trace file as comment:
520 \verbatim
521 --cfg=tracing/comment:my_simulation_identifier
522 \endverbatim
523
524 - Add the contents of a textual file on top of the trace file as comment:
525 \verbatim
526 --cfg=tracing/comment_file:my_file_with_additional_information.txt
527 \endverbatim
528
529 Please, use these two parameters (for comments) to make reproducible
530 simulations. For additional details about this and all tracing
531 options, check See the \ref tracing_tracing_options.
532
533 \section options_smpi Configuring SMPI
534
535 The SMPI interface provides several specific configuration items.
536 These are uneasy to see since the code is usually launched through the
537 \c smiprun script directly.
538
539 \subsection options_smpi_bench Automatic benchmarking of SMPI code
540
541 In SMPI, the sequential code is automatically benchmarked, and these
542 computations are automatically reported to the simulator. That is to
543 say that if you have a large computation between a \c MPI_Recv() and a
544 \c MPI_Send(), SMPI will automatically benchmark the duration of this
545 code, and create an execution task within the simulator to take this
546 into account. For that, the actual duration is measured on the host
547 machine and then scaled to the power of the corresponding simulated
548 machine. The variable \b smpi/running_power allows to specify the
549 computational power of the host machine (in flop/s) to use when
550 scaling the execution times. It defaults to 20000, but you really want
551 to update it to get accurate simulation results.
552
553 When the code is constituted of numerous consecutive MPI calls, the
554 previous mechanism feeds the simulation kernel with numerous tiny
555 computations. The \b smpi/cpu_threshold item becomes handy when this
556 impacts badly the simulation performance. It specify a threshold (in
557 second) under which the execution chunks are not reported to the
558 simulation kernel (default value: 1e-6). Please note that in some
559 circonstances, this optimization can hinder the simulation accuracy.
560
561  In some cases, however, one may wish to disable simulation of
562 application computation. This is the case when SMPI is used not to
563 simulate an MPI applications, but instead an MPI code that performs
564 "live replay" of another MPI app (e.g., ScalaTrace's replay tool,
565 various on-line simulators that run an app at scale). In this case the
566 computation of the replay/simulation logic should not be simulated by
567 SMPI. Instead, the replay tool or on-line simulator will issue
568 "computation events", which correspond to the actual MPI simulation
569 being replayed/simulated. At the moment, these computation events can
570 be simulated using SMPI by calling internal smpi_execute*() functions.
571
572 To disable the benchmarking/simulation of computation in the simulated
573 application, the variable \b
574 smpi/simulation_computation should be set to no
575
576 \subsection options_smpi_timing Reporting simulation time
577
578 Most of the time, you run MPI code through SMPI to compute the time it
579 would take to run it on a platform that you don't have. But since the
580 code is run through the \c smpirun script, you don't have any control
581 on the launcher code, making difficult to report the simulated time
582 when the simulation ends. If you set the \b smpi/display_timing item
583 to 1, \c smpirun will display this information when the simulation ends. \verbatim
584 Simulation time: 1e3 seconds.
585 \endverbatim
586
587 \subsection options_smpi_global Automatic privatization of global variables
588
589 MPI executables are meant to be executed in separated processes, but SMPI is 
590 executed in only one process. Global variables from executables will be placed 
591 in the same memory zone and shared between processes, causing hard to find bugs.
592 To avoid this, several options are possible :
593   - Manual edition of the code, for example to add __thread keyword before data
594   declaration, which allows the resulting code to work with SMPI, but only 
595   if the thread factory (see \ref options_virt_factory) is used, as global 
596   variables are then placed in the TLS (thread local storage) segment. 
597   - Source-to-source transformation, to add a level of indirection 
598   to the global variables. SMPI does this for F77 codes compiled with smpiff, 
599   and used to provide coccinelle scripts for C codes, which are not functional anymore.
600   - Compilation pass, to have the compiler automatically put the data in 
601   an adapted zone. 
602   - Runtime automatic switching of the data segments. SMPI stores a copy of 
603   each global data segment for each process, and at each context switch replaces 
604   the actual data with its copy from the right process. This mechanism uses mmap,
605   and is for now limited to systems supporting this functionnality (all Linux 
606   and some BSD should be compatible).
607   Another limitation is that SMPI only accounts for global variables defined in
608   the executable. If the processes use external global variables from dynamic 
609   libraries, they won't be switched correctly. To avoid this, using static 
610   linking is advised (but not with the simgrid library, to avoid replicating 
611   its own global variables). 
612
613   To use this runtime automatic switching, the variable \b smpi/privatize_global_variables
614   should be set to yes
615
616
617
618 \subsection options_model_smpi_detached Simulating MPI detached send
619
620 This threshold specifies the size in bytes under which the send will return 
621 immediately. This is different from the threshold detailed in  \ref options_model_network_asyncsend
622 because the message is not effectively sent when the send is posted. SMPI still waits for the
623 correspondant receive to be posted to perform the communication operation. This threshold can be set 
624 by changing the \b smpi/send_is_detached item. The default value is 65536.
625
626 \subsection options_model_smpi_collectives Simulating MPI collective algorithms
627
628 SMPI implements more than 100 different algorithms for MPI collective communication, to accurately 
629 simulate the behavior of most of the existing MPI libraries. The \b smpi/coll_selector item can be used
630  to use the decision logic of either OpenMPI or MPICH libraries (values: ompi or mpich, by default SMPI
631 uses naive version of collective operations). Each collective operation can be manually selected with a 
632 \b smpi/collective_name:algo_name. Available algorithms are listed in \ref SMPI_collective_algorithms .
633
634
635 \section options_generic Configuring other aspects of SimGrid
636
637 \subsection options_generic_path XML file inclusion path
638
639 It is possible to specify a list of directories to search into for the
640 \<include\> tag in XML files by using the \b path configuration
641 item. To add several directory to the path, set the configuration
642 item several times, as in \verbatim
643 --cfg=path:toto --cfg=path:tutu
644 \endverbatim
645
646 \subsection options_generic_exit Behavior on Ctrl-C
647
648 By default, when Ctrl-C is pressed, the status of all existing
649 simulated processes is displayed before exiting the simulation. This is very useful to debug your
650 code, but it can reveal troublesome in some cases (such as when the
651 amount of processes becomes really big). This behavior is disabled
652 when \b verbose-exit is set to 0 (it is to 1 by default).
653
654
655 \section options_log Logging Configuration
656
657 It can be done by using XBT. Go to \ref XBT_log for more details.
658
659 \section options_perf Performance optimizations
660
661 \subsection options_perf_context Context factory
662
663 In order to achieve higher performance, you might want to use the raw
664 context factory which avoids any system call when switching between
665 tasks. If it is not possible you might use ucontext instead.
666
667 \subsection options_perf_guard_size Disabling stack guard pages
668
669 A stack guard page is usually used which prevents the stack from
670 overflowing on other parts of the memory. However this might have a
671 performance impact if a huge number of processes is created.  The
672 option \b contexts:guard_size is the number of stack guard pages
673 used. By setting it to 0, no guard pages will be used: in this case,
674 you should avoid using small stacks (\b stack_size) as the stack will
675 silently overflow on other parts of the memory.
676
677 \section options_index Index of all existing configuration items
678
679 - \c contexts/factory: \ref options_virt_factory
680 - \c contexts/nthreads: \ref options_virt_parallel
681 - \c contexts/parallel_threshold: \ref options_virt_parallel
682 - \c contexts/stack_size: \ref options_virt_stacksize
683 - \c contexts/synchro: \ref options_virt_parallel
684 - \c contexts/guard_size: \ref options_virt_parallel
685
686 - \c cpu/maxmin_selective_update: \ref options_model_optim
687 - \c cpu/model: \ref options_model_select
688 - \c cpu/optim: \ref options_model_optim
689
690 - \c gtnets/jitter: \ref options_pls
691 - \c gtnets/jitter_seed: \ref options_pls
692
693 - \c maxmin/precision: \ref options_model_precision
694
695 - \c model-check: \ref options_modelchecking
696 - \c model-check/property: \ref options_modelchecking_liveness
697 - \c model-check/checkpoint: \ref options_modelchecking_steps
698 - \c model-check/reduce: \ref options_modelchecking_reduction
699
700 - \c network/bandwidth_factor: \ref options_model_network_coefs
701 - \c network/coordinates: \ref options_model_network_coord
702 - \c network/crosstraffic: \ref options_model_network_crosstraffic
703 - \c network/latency_factor: \ref options_model_network_coefs
704 - \c network/maxmin_selective_update: \ref options_model_optim
705 - \c network/model: \ref options_model_select
706 - \c network/optim: \ref options_model_optim
707 - \c network/sender_gap: \ref options_model_network_sendergap
708 - \c network/TCP_gamma: \ref options_model_network_gamma
709 - \c network/weight_S: \ref options_model_network_coefs
710
711 - \c ns3/TcpModel: \ref options_pls
712
713 - \c surf/nthreads: \ref options_model_nthreads
714
715 - \c smpi/simulation_computation: \ref options_smpi_bench
716 - \c smpi/running_power: \ref options_smpi_bench
717 - \c smpi/display_timing: \ref options_smpi_timing
718 - \c smpi/cpu_threshold: \ref options_smpi_bench
719 - \c smpi/async_small_thres: \ref options_model_network_asyncsend
720 - \c smpi/send_is_detached: \ref options_model_smpi_detached
721 - \c smpi/coll_selector: \ref options_model_smpi_collectives
722 - \c smpi/privatize_global_variables: \ref options_smpi_global
723
724 - \c path: \ref options_generic_path
725 - \c verbose-exit: \ref options_generic_exit
726
727 - \c workstation/model: \ref options_model_select
728
729 */