Logo AND Algorithmique Numérique Distribuée

Public GIT Repository
63aebcf2ac5e4a2ba018cb6b7a6b334ec7ed1495
[simgrid.git] / doc / doxygen / install.doc
1 /*! 
2 @page install Installing Simgrid
3
4 @tableofcontents
5
6 The easiest way to install SimGrid is to go for a binary package.
7 Under Debian or Ubuntu, this is very easy as SimGrid is directly
8 integrated to the official repositories. Under Windows, SimGrid can be
9 installed in a few clicks once you downloaded the installer from
10 gforge. If you just want to use Java, simply copy the jar file on your
11 disk and you're set. 
12
13 Recompiling an official archive is not much more complex, actually.
14 SimGrid has very few dependencies and rely only on very standard
15 tools.  First, download the *@SimGridRelease.tar.gz* archive
16 from [the download page](https://gforge.inria.fr/frs/?group_id=12).
17 Then, recompiling the archive should be done in a few lines:
18
19 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~{.sh}
20 tar xf @SimGridRelease.tar.gz
21 cd @SimGridRelease
22 cmake -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/opt/simgrid .
23 make
24 make install
25 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
26
27 If you want to stay on the bleeding edge, you should get the latest
28 git version, and recompile it as you would do for an official archive.
29 Depending on the files you change in the source tree, some extra
30 tools may be needed.
31
32 @section install_binary Installing a binary package 
33
34 @subsection install_binary_linux Binary packages for linux
35
36 Most of the developers use a Debian or Ubuntu system, and some of us
37 happen to be Debian Maintainers, so the packages for these systems are
38 well integrated with these systems and very uptodate. To install them,
39 simply type:
40
41 @verbatim
42 apt-get install simgrid
43 @endverbatim
44
45 On other Linux variants, you probably want to go for a source install.
46 Please contact us if you want to contribute the build scripts for your
47 prefered distribution.
48
49 @subsection install_binary_win Installation wizard for Windows
50
51 Before starting the installation, make sure that you have the following dependencies:
52   @li cmake 2.8 <a href="http://www.cmake.org/cmake/resources/software.html">(download page)</a>
53   @li MinGW <a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw/files/MinGW/">(download page)</a>
54   @li perl <a href="http://www.activestate.com/activeperl/downloads">(download page)</a>
55   @li git <a href="http://msysgit.googlecode.com/files/Git-1.7.4-preview20110204.exe">(download page)</a>
56
57 Then download the package <a href="https://gforge.inria.fr/frs/?group_id=12">SimGrid Installer</a>,
58 execute it and follow instructions.
59
60 @image html win_install_01.png Step 1: Accept the license.
61 @image html win_install_02.png Step 2: Select packets to install.
62 @image html win_install_03.png Step 3: Choice where to install packets previously selected. Please don't use spaces in path.
63 @image html win_install_04.png Step 4: Add CLASSPATH to environment variables.
64 @image html win_install_05.png Step 5: Add PATH to environment variables.
65 @image html win_install_06.png Step 6: Restart your computer to take in consideration environment variables.
66
67 @subsection install_binary_java Using the binary jar file
68
69 The easiest way to install the Java bindings of SimGrid is to grab the
70 jar file from the 
71 <a href="https://gforge.inria.fr/frs/?group_id=12">Download page</a>,
72 and copy it in your classpath (typically, in the same directory than
73 your source code). If you go for that version, there is no need to
74 install the C library as it is bundled within the jar file. Actually,
75 only a bunch of architectures are supported this way to keep the
76 jarfile size under control and because we don't have access to every
77 exotic architectures ourselves. 
78
79 If the jarfile fails on you, complaining that your architecture is not
80 supported, drop us an email: we may extend the jarfile for you, if we
81 have access to your architecture to build SimGrid on it.
82
83 @section install_src Installing from source
84
85 @subsection install_src_deps Resolving the dependencies
86
87 SimGrid only uses very standard tools: 
88   @li C compiler, C++ compiler, make and friends.
89   @li perl (but you may try to go without it)
90   @li We use cmake to configure our compilation 
91       (<a href="http://www.cmake.org/cmake/resources/software.html">download page</a>).
92       You need cmake version 2.8 or higher. You may want to use ccmake
93       for a graphical interface over cmake. 
94
95 On MacOSX, it is advised to use the clang compiler (version 3.0 or
96 higher), from either MacPort or XCode. If you insist on using gcc on
97 this system, you still need a recent version of this compiler, so you
98 need an unofficial gcc47 from MacPort because the version provided by
99 Apple is ways to ancient to suffice. See also @ref install_cmake_mac.
100
101 On Windows, it is strongly advised to use the 
102 <a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/mingw/files/MinGW/">MinGW
103 environment</a> to build SimGrid. Any other compilers are not tests
104 (and thus probably broken). We usually use the 
105 <a href="http://www.activestate.com/activeperl/downloads">activestate</a>
106 version of Perl, and the 
107 <a href="http://msysgit.googlecode.com/files/Git-1.7.4-preview20110204.exe">msys</a>
108 version of git on this architecture, but YMMV. See also @ref install_cmake_win.
109
110 @subsection install_src_fetch Retrieving the source
111
112 If you just want to use SimGrid, you should probably grab the latest
113 stable version available from the 
114 <a href="https://gforge.inria.fr/frs/?group_id=12">download page</a>.
115 We do our best to release soon and release often, but sometimes you
116 need to install the developer version of SimGrid, directly from the
117 git repository. Avoid the git version if you are not sure, as it may
118 break on you, or even worse.
119
120 @verbatim
121 git clone git://scm.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid/simgrid.git simgrid
122 @endverbatim
123
124 @subsection install_src_config Configuring the build
125
126 Note that compile-time options are very different from @ref options
127 "run-time options".
128
129 \subsubsection install_cmake_howto Setting compilation options
130
131 The default configuration should be ok for most usages, but if you
132 need to change something, there is several ways to do so. First, you
133 can use environment variable. For example, you can change the used
134 compilers by issuing these commands before launching cmake:
135
136 @verbatim
137 export CC=gcc-4.4 
138 export CXX=g++-4.4
139 @endverbatim
140
141 Another way to do so is to use the -D argument of cmake as follows.
142 Note that the terminating dot is mandatory (see @ref
143 install_cmake_outsrc to understand its meaning).
144
145 @verbatim
146 cmake -DCC=clang -DCXX=clang++ .
147 @endverbatim
148
149 Finally, you can use a graphical interface such as ccmake to change
150 these settings. Simply follow the instructions after starting the
151 interface.
152
153 @verbatim
154 ccmake .
155 @endverbatim
156
157 \subsubsection install_cmake_list SimGrid compilation options
158
159 In addition to the classical cmake configuration variables, SimGrid
160 accepts several options, as listed below.
161
162   @li <b>CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX</b> (path): Where to install SimGrid 
163       (e.g. /usr/local or /opt).
164
165   @li <b>enable_compile_optimizations</b> (ON/OFF): request the
166       compiler to produce efficient code. You want to activate it,
167       unless you want to debug SimGrid itself (as efficient code may
168       be appear mangled to the debugers).
169
170   @li <b>enable_debug</b> (ON/OFF): disable this if simulation speed
171       really matters to you. All log messages of gravity debug or
172       below will be discarded at compilation time. Since there is
173       quite a bunch of such log messages in SimGrid itself, this can
174       reveal faster than discarding them at runtime as usually. But of
175       course, it is then impossible to get any debug message from
176       SimGrid if something goes wrong.
177
178   @li <b>enable_msg_deprecated</b> (ON/OFF): enable this option if
179       your code used a feature of Simgrid that was droped or modified
180       in recent releases of SimGrid. You should update your code if
181       possible, but with this option, SimGrid will try to emulate its
182       old behavior.
183
184   @li <b>enable_model-checking</b> (ON/OFF): Only enable this if you
185       actually plan to use the model-checking aspect of SimGrid. This
186       mode of execution is still under heavy work, but it should be
187       rather usable now. Be <b>warned</b> that this option will hinder
188       your simulation speed even if you simulate without activating
189       the model-checker. We are working on improving this situation.
190
191   @li <b>enable_compile_warnings</b> (ON/OFF): request the compiler to
192       issue error message whenever the source code is not perfectly
193       clean. If you develop SimGrid itself, you must activate it to
194       ensure the code quality, but as a user, that option will only
195       bring you issues.
196       
197   @li <b>enable_lib_static</b> (ON/OFF): enable this if you want to
198       compile the static library (but you should consider enjoying
199       this new century instead).
200       
201   @li <b>enable_maintainer_mode</b> (ON/OFF): you only need to set
202       this option if you modify very specific parts of SimGrid itself
203       (the XML parsers and other related elements). Adds an extra
204       dependency on flex and flexml.
205      
206   @li <b>enable_tracing</b> (ON/OFF): disable this if you have issues
207       with the tracing module. But this module is now very stable and
208       you really should try to enjoy this beauty.
209
210   @li <b>enable_smpi</b> (ON/OFF): disable this if you have issues
211       with the module allowing to run MPI code on top of SimGrid. This
212       module very stable, but if you really don't need it, you can
213       disable it.
214       
215   @li <b>enable_mallocators</b> (ON/OFF): disable this when tracking
216       memory issues within SimGrid, or the caching mechanism used
217       internally will fool the debugers.
218
219   @li <b>enable_jedule</b> (ON/OFF): enable this to get SimDag
220       producing traces that can then be vizualized with the Jedule
221       external tool.
222
223   @li <b>enable_lua</b> (ON/OFF): enable this if you want to enjoy the
224       lua bindings of SimGrid. Adds an extra dependency on lua library
225       and developper header files.
226
227
228   @li <b>enable_gtnets</b> (ON/OFF): whether you want to use gtnets.
229       See section @ref pls_simgrid_configuration_gtnets.
230   @li <b>gtnets_path</b> (path): GTNetS installation directory 
231       (eg /usr or /opt).
232   @li <b>enable_ns3</b> (ON/OFF): whether you want to use ns3.
233       See section @ref pls_simgrid_configuration_ns3.
234   @li <b>ns3_path</b> (path): NS3 installation directory (eg /usr or /opt).
235   @li <b>enable_latency_bound_tracking</b> (ON/OFF): enable it if you
236       want to be warned when communications are limited by round trip
237       time while doing packet-level simulation. 
238
239 \subsubsection install_cmake_reset Resetting the compilation configuration
240
241 If you need to empty the cache of values saved by cmake (either
242 because you added a new library or because something seriously went
243 wrong), you can simply delete the file CMakeCache.txt that is created
244 at the root of the source tree. You may also want to edit this file
245 directly in some circumstances.
246
247 \subsubsection install_cmake_outsrc Compiling into a separate directory
248
249 By default, the files produced during the compilation are placed in
250 the source directory. As the compilation generates a lot of files, it
251 is advised to to put them all in a separate directory. It is then
252 easier to cleanup, and this allows to compile several configurations
253 out of the same source tree. For that, simply enter the directory
254 where you want the produced files to land, and invoke cmake (or
255 ccmake) with the full path to the simgrid source as last argument.
256 This approach is called "compilation out of source tree".
257
258 @verbatim
259 mkdir build
260 cd build
261 cmake [options] ..
262 make
263 @endverbatim
264
265 \subsubsection install_cmake_win Cmake on Windows (with MinGW)
266
267 Cmake can produce several kind of of makefiles. Under Windows, it has
268 no way of determining what kind you want to use, so you have to hint it:
269
270 @verbatim
271 cmake -G"MinGW Makefiles" (other options) .
272 mingw32-make
273 @endverbatim
274
275 \subsubsection install_cmake_mac Cmake on Mac OSX
276
277 SimGrid compiles like a charm with clang on Mac OSX:
278
279 @verbatim
280 cmake -DCMAKE_C_COMPILER=/path/to/clang -DCMAKE_CXX_COMPILER=/path/to/clang++ .
281 make
282 @endverbatim
283
284 With the XCode version of clang 4.1, you may get the following error message:
285 @verbatim
286 CMake Error: Parse error in cache file build_dir/CMakeCache.txt. Offending entry: /SDKs/MacOSX10.8.sdk
287 @endverbatim
288
289 In that case, edit the CMakeCache.txt file directly, so that the
290 CMAKE_OSX_SYSROOT is similar to the following. Don't worry about the
291 warning that the "-pthread" argument is not used, if it appears.
292 @verbatim
293 CMAKE_OSX_SYSROOT:PATH=/Applications/XCode.app/Contents/Developer/Platforms/MacOSX.platform/Developer
294 @endverbatim
295
296 \subsection install_src_compil Compiling SimGrid
297
298 In most cases, compiling and installing simgrid is enough:
299
300 @verbatim
301 make
302 make install # try "sudo make install" if you don't have the permission to write
303 @endverbatim
304
305 In addition, several compilation targets are provided in SimGrid. If
306 your system is well configured, the full list of targets is available
307 for completion when using the Tab key. Note that some of the existing
308 targets are not really for publc consumption so don't worry if some
309 stuff don't work for you.
310
311 @verbatim
312 make simgrid                    Builds only the simgrid library and not any example
313 make masterslave                Builds only this example (and its dependencies)
314 make clean                      Clean the results of a previous compilation
315 make install                    Install the project (doc/ bin/ lib/ include/)
316 make uninstall                  Uninstall the project (doc/ bin/ lib/ include/)
317 make dist                       Cuild a distribution archive (tgz)
318 make distcheck                  Check the dist (make + make dist + tests on the distribution)
319 make simgrid_documentation      Create simgrid documentation
320 @endverbatim
321
322 If you want to see what is really happening, try adding VERBOSE=1 to
323 your compilation requests:
324
325 @verbatim
326 make VERBOSE=1  
327 @endverbatim
328
329 @subsection install_src_test Testing SimGrid 
330
331 Once everything is built, you may want to test the result. SimGrid
332 comes with an extensive set of regression tests (see @ref
333 inside_cmake_addtest "that page of the insider manual" for more
334 details). Running the tests is done using the ctest binary that comes
335 with cmake. These tests are run every night and the result is publicly
336 <a href="http://cdash.inria.fr/CDash/index.php?project=Simgrid">available</a>.
337
338 \verbatim
339 ctest                     # Launch all tests
340 ctest -D Experimental     # Launch all tests and report the result to
341                           # http://cdash.inria.fr/CDash/index.php?project=SimGrid
342 ctest -R msg              # Launch only the tests which name match the string "msg"
343 ctest -j4                 # Launch all tests in parallel, at most 4 at the same time
344 ctest --verbose           # Display all details on what's going on
345 ctest --output-on-failure # Only get verbose for the tests that fail
346
347 ctest -R msg- -j5 --output-on-failure # You changed MSG and want to check that you didn't break anything, huh?
348                                       # That's fine, I do so all the time myself.
349 \endverbatim
350
351 \section install_setting_own Setting up your own code
352
353 \subsection install_setting_MSG MSG code on Unix (Linux or Mac OSX)
354
355 Do not build your simulator by modifying the SimGrid examples.  Go
356 outside the SimGrid source tree and create your own working directory
357 (say <tt>/home/joe/SimGrid/MyFirstScheduler/</tt>).
358
359 Suppose your simulation has the following structure (remember it is
360 just an example to illustrate a possible way to compile everything;
361 feel free to organize it as you want).
362
363 \li <tt>sched.h</tt>: a description of the core of the
364     scheduler (i.e. which functions are can be used by the
365     agents). For example we could find the following functions
366     (master, forwarder, slave).
367 \li <tt>sched.c</tt>: a C file including <tt>sched.h</tt> and
368     implementing the core of the scheduler. Most of these
369     functions use the MSG functions defined in section \ref
370     msg_task_usage.
371 \li <tt>masterslave.c</tt>: a C file with the main function, i.e.
372     the MSG initialization (MSG_init()), the platform
373     creation (e.g. with MSG_create_environment()), the
374     deployment phase (e.g. with MSG_function_register() and
375     MSG_launch_application()) and the call to MSG_main()).
376
377 To compile such a program, we suggest to use the following
378 Makefile. It is a generic Makefile that we have used many times with
379 our students when we teach the C language.
380
381 \verbatim
382 all: masterslave
383 masterslave: masterslave.o sched.o
384
385 INSTALL_PATH = $$HOME
386 CC = gcc
387 PEDANTIC_PARANOID_FREAK =       -O0 -Wshadow -Wcast-align \
388                                 -Waggregate-return -Wmissing-prototypes -Wmissing-declarations \
389                                 -Wstrict-prototypes -Wmissing-prototypes -Wmissing-declarations \
390                                 -Wmissing-noreturn -Wredundant-decls -Wnested-externs \
391                                 -Wpointer-arith -Wwrite-strings -finline-functions
392 REASONABLY_CAREFUL_DUDE =       -Wall
393 NO_PRAYER_FOR_THE_WICKED =      -w -O2
394 WARNINGS =                      $(REASONABLY_CAREFUL_DUDE)
395 CFLAGS = -g $(WARNINGS)
396
397 INCLUDES = -I$(INSTALL_PATH)/include
398 DEFS = -L$(INSTALL_PATH)/lib/
399 LDADD = -lm -lsimgrid
400 LIBS =
401
402 %: %.o
403         $(CC) $(INCLUDES) $(DEFS) $(CFLAGS) $^ $(LIBS) $(LDADD) -o $@
404
405 %.o: %.c
406         $(CC) $(INCLUDES) $(DEFS) $(CFLAGS) -c -o $@ $<
407
408 clean:
409         rm -f $(BIN_FILES) *.o *~
410 .SUFFIXES:
411 .PHONY: clean
412
413 \endverbatim
414
415 The first two lines indicates what should be build when typing make
416 (<tt>masterslave</tt>) and of which files it is to be made of
417 (<tt>masterslave.o</tt> and <tt>sched.o</tt>). This makefile assumes
418 that you have set up correctly your <tt>LD_LIBRARY_PATH</tt> variable
419 (look, there is a <tt>LDADD = -lm -lsimgrid</tt>). If you prefer using
420 the static version, remove the <tt>-lsimgrid</tt> and add a
421 <tt>$(INSTALL_PATH)/lib/libsimgrid.a</tt> on the next line, right
422 after the <tt>LIBS = </tt>.
423
424 More generally, if you have never written a Makefile by yourself, type
425 in a terminal: <tt>info make</tt> and read the introduction. The
426 previous example should be enough for a first try but you may want to
427 perform some more complex compilations...
428
429
430 \subsection install_setting_win_provided Compile the "HelloWorld" project on Windows
431
432 In the SimGrid install directory you should have an HelloWorld project to explain you how to start
433 compiling a source file. There are:
434 \verbatim
435 - HelloWorld.c          The example source file.
436 - CMakeLists.txt        It allows to configure the project.
437 - README                This explaination.
438 \endverbatim
439
440 Now let's compile this example:
441 \li Run windows shell "cmd".
442 \li Open HelloWorld Directory ('cd' command line).
443 \li Create a build directory and change directory. (optional)
444 \li Type 'cmake -G"MinGW Makefiles" \<path_to_HelloWorld_project\>'
445 \li Run mingw32-make
446 \li You should obtain a runnable example ("HelloWorld.exe").
447
448 For compiling your own code you can simply copy the HelloWorld project and rename source name. It will
449 create a target with the same name of the source.
450
451
452 \subsection install_setting_win_new Adding and Compiling a new example on Windows
453
454 \li Put your source file into the helloWord directory.
455 \li Edit CMakeLists.txt by removing the Find Targets section and add those two lines into this section
456 \verbatim
457 ################
458 # FIND TARGETS #
459 ################
460 #It creates a target called 'TARGET_NAME.exe' with the sources 'SOURCES'
461 add_executable(TARGET_NAME SOURCES)
462 #Links TARGET_NAME with simgrid
463 target_link_libraries(TARGET_NAME simgrid)
464 \endverbatim
465 \li To initialize and build your project, you'll need to run
466 \verbatim
467 cmake -G"MinGW Makefiles" <path_to_HelloWorld_project>
468 \endverbatim
469 \li Run "mingw32-make"
470 \li You should obtain "TARGET_NAME.exe".
471
472 \subsection install_Win_ruby Setup a virtualbox to use SimGrid-Ruby on windows
473
474 Allan Espinosa made these set of Vagrant rules available so that you
475 can use the SimGrid Ruby bindings in a virtual machine using
476 VirtualBox. Thanks to him for that. You can find his project here:
477 https://github.com/aespinosa/simgrid-vagrant
478
479
480
481 */