Logo AND Algorithmique Numérique Distribuée

Public GIT Repository
39338af0709d7fda5c2395363f98659eb42f74d1
[simgrid.git] / doc / doxygen / platform.doc
1 /*! \page platform Step 1: %Model the underlying platform
2
3 @tableofcontents
4
5 In order to run any simulation, SimGrid must be provided with three things:
6 something to run (i.e., your code), a description of the platform on which you
7 want to simulate your application and lastly information about the deployment
8 process: Which process should be deployed to which processor/core?
9
10 For the last two items, there are essentially two possible ways you can provide
11 this information as an input:
12 \li You can program it, either by using the Lua console (
13     \ref MSG_Lua_funct) or, if you're using MSG, some of MSG's platform and
14     deployment functions (\ref msg_simulation). If you want to use this,
15     check the particular documentation. (You can also check the section
16     \ref pf_flexml_bypassing, however, this documentation is deprecated;
17     there is a new, but undocumented, way to do it properly).
18 \li You can use two XML files: one contains the platform description while
19     the other contains the deployment instructions.
20
21 For more information on SimGrid's deployment features, please refer to
22 the \ref deployment documentation.
23
24 The platform description may be intricate. This documentation is all
25 about how to write this file: The basic concepts are introduced. Furthermore,
26 advanced options are explained. Additionally, some hints and tips on how to
27 write a good platform description are given.
28
29 \section pf_overview Some words about XML and DTD
30
31 We chose to use XML not only because it's extensible but also because many
32 tools (and plugins for existing tools) are available that facilitate editing and
33 validating XML files. Furthermore, libraries that parse XML are often already
34 available and very well tested.
35
36 The XML checking is done based on the Document Type Definition (DTD) file,
37 available at
38 <a href="http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd">http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd</a>.
39
40 If you read the DTD, you should notice the following:
41 \li The platform tags contain a version attribute; the current version is 3.
42     This property might be used in the future to provide backwards
43     compatibility.
44 \li The DTD contains definitions for the two files used by SimGrid (i.e.,
45     platform description and deployment).
46
47 \section pf_basics Basic concepts
48
49 Nowadays, the Internet is composed of a bunch of independently managed
50 networks. Within each of those networks, there are entry and exit
51 points (most of the time, you can both enter and exit through the same
52 point); this allows to leave the current network and reach other
53 networks, possibly even in other locations.
54 At the upper level, such a network is called
55 <b>Autonomous System (AS)</b>, while at the lower level it is named
56 sub-network, or LAN (local area network).
57 They are indeed autonomous: routing is defined
58 (within the limits of his network) by the administrator, and so, those
59 networks can operate without a connection to other
60 networks. So-called gateways allow you to go from one network to
61 another, if such a (physical) connection exists. Every node in one network
62 that can be directly reached (i.e., without traversing other nodes) from
63 another network is called a gateway.
64 Each autonomous system consists of equipment such as cables (network links),
65 routers and switches as well as computers.
66
67 The structure of the SimGrid platform description relies exactly on the same
68 concept as a real-life platform (see above).  Every resource (computers,
69 network equipment etc.) belongs to an AS, which can be defined by using the
70 \<AS\> tag. Within an AS, the routing between its elements can be defined
71 abitrarily. There are several modes for routing, and exactly one mode must be
72 selected by specifying the routing attribute in the AS tag:
73
74 \verbatim
75 <AS id="AS0" routing="Full">
76 \endverbatim
77
78 \remark
79   Other supported values for the routing attribute can be found below, Section
80   \ref pf_raf.
81
82 There is also the ``<route>`` tag; this tag takes two attributes, ``src`` (source)
83 and ``dst`` (destination). Both source and destination must be valid identifiers
84 for routers (these will be introduced later). Contained by the ``<route>`` are
85 network links; these links must be used in order to communicate from the source
86 to the destination specified in the tag. Hence, a route merely describes
87 how to reach a router from another router.
88
89 \remark
90   More information and (code-)examples can be found in Section \ref pf_rm.
91
92 An AS can also contain itself one or more AS; this allows you to
93 model the hierarchy of your platform.
94
95 ### Within each AS, the following types of resources exist:
96
97 %Resource        | Documented in Section | Description
98 --------------- | --------------------- | -----------
99 AS              |                       | Every Autonomous System (AS) may contain one or more AS.
100 host            | \ref pf_host          | This entity carries out the actual computation. For this reason, it contains processors (with potentially multiple cores).
101 router          | \ref pf_router        | In SimGrid, routers are used to provide helpful information to routing algorithms.  Routers may also act as gateways, connecting several autonomous systems with each other.
102 link            | \ref pf_link          | In SimGrid, (network)links define a connection between two or potentially even more resources. Every link has a bandwidth and a latency and may potentially experience congestion.
103 cluster         | \ref pf_cluster       | In SimGrid, clusters were introduced to model large and homogenous environments. They are not really a resource by themselves - technically, they are only a shortcut, as they will internally set up all the hosts, network and routing for you, i.e., using this resource, one can easily setup thousands of hosts and links in a few lines of code. Each cluster is itself an AS.
104
105 %As it is desirable to interconnect these resources, a routing has to be
106 defined. The AS is supposed to be Autonomous, hence this has to be done at the
107 AS level. The AS handles two different types of entities (<b>host/router</b>
108 and <b>AS</b>). However, the user is responsible to define routes between those resources,
109 otherwise entities will be unconnected and therefore unreachable from other
110 entities. Although several routing algorithms are built into SimGrid (see
111 \ref pf_rm), you might encounter a case where you want to define routes
112 manually (for instance, due to specific requirements of your platform).
113
114 There are three tags to use:
115 \li <b>ASroute</b>: to define routes between two  <b>AS</b>
116 \li <b>route</b>: to define routes between two <b>host/router</b>
117 \li <b>bypassRoute</b>: to define routes between two <b>AS</b> that
118     will bypass default routing (as specified by the ``routing`` attribute
119     supplied to ``<AS>``, see above).
120
121 Here is an illustration of these concepts:
122
123 ![An illustration of an AS hierarchy. Here, AS1 contains 5 other ASes who in turn may contain other ASes as well.](AS_hierarchy.png)
124  Circles represent processing units and squares represent network routers. Bold
125     lines represent communication links. AS2 models the core of a national
126     network interconnecting a small flat cluster (AS4) and a larger
127     hierarchical cluster (AS5), a subset of a LAN (AS6), and a set of peers
128     scattered around the world (AS7).
129
130 \section pf_pftags Resource description
131
132 \subsection  pf_As Platform: The &lt;AS&gt; tag
133
134 The concept of an AS was already outlined above (Section \ref pf_basics);
135 recall that the AS is so important because it groups other resources (such
136 as routers/hosts) together (in fact, these resources must be contained by
137 an AS).
138
139 Available attributes :
140
141 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
142 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
143 id              | yes       | String | The identifier of an AS; facilitates referring to this AS. ID must be unique.
144 routing         | yes       | Full\| Floyd\| Dijkstra\| DijkstraCache\| None\| Vivaldi\| Cluster | See Section \ref pf_rm for details.
145
146
147 <b>Example:</b>
148 \verbatim
149 <AS id="AS0" routing="Full">
150    <host id="host1" power="1000000000"/>
151    <host id="host2" power="1000000000"/>
152    <link id="link1" bandwidth="125000000" latency="0.000100"/>
153    <route src="host1" dst="host2"><link_ctn id="link1"/></route>
154 </AS>
155 \endverbatim
156
157 In this example, AS0 contains two hosts (host1 and host2). The route
158 between the hosts goes through link1.
159
160 \subsection pf_Cr Computing resources: hosts, clusters and peers.
161
162 \subsubsection pf_host &lt;host/&gt;
163
164 A <b>host</b> represents a computer/node card. Every host is able to execute
165 code and it can send and receive data to/from other hosts. Most importantly,
166 a host can contain more than 1 core.
167
168 ### Attributes: ###
169
170 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
171 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
172 id              | yes       | String | The identifier of the host. facilitates referring to this AS.
173 power           | yes       | double (must be > 0.0) | Computational power of every core of this host in FLOPS. Must be larger than 0.0.
174 core            | no        | int (Default: 1) | The number of cores of this host. If more than one core is specified, the "power" parameter refers to every core, i.e., the total computational power is no_of_cores*power.<br /> If 6 cores are specified, up to 6 tasks can be executed without sharing the computational power; if more than 6 tasks are executed, computational power will be shared among these tasks. <br /> <b>Warning:</b> Although functional, this model was never scientifically assessed.
175 availability    | no        | int    | <b>Specify if the percentage of power available.</b> (What? TODO)
176 availability_file| no       | string | (Relative or absolute) filename to use as input; must contain availability traces for this host. The syntax of this file is defined below. <br /> <b>Note:</b> The filename must be specified with your system's format.
177 state           | no        | ON\|OFF<br/> (Default: ON) | Is this host running or not?
178 state_file      | no        | string |  Same mechanism as availability_file.<br /> <b>Note:</b> The filename must be specified with your system's format.
179 coordinates     | no        | string | Must be provided when choosing the Vivaldi, coordinate-based routing model for the AS the host belongs to. More details can be found in the Section \ref pf_P2P_tags.
180
181 ### Possible children: ###
182
183 Tag name        | Description | Documentation
184 ------------    | ----------- | -------------
185 \<mount/\>        | Defines mounting points between some storage resource and the host. | \ref pf_storage_entity_mount
186 \<prop/\>         | The prop tag allows you to define additional information on this host following the attribute/value schema. You may want to use it to give information to the tool you use for rendering your simulation, for example. | N/A
187
188 ### Example ###
189
190 \verbatim
191    <host id="host1" power="1000000000"/>
192    <host id="host2" power="1000000000">
193         <prop id="color" value="blue"/>
194         <prop id="rendershape" value="square"/>
195    </host>
196 \endverbatim
197
198
199 \anchor pf_host_dynamism
200 ### Expressing dynamism ###
201
202 SimGrid provides mechanisms to change a hosts' availability over
203 time, using the ``availability_file`` attribute to the ``\<host\>`` tag
204 and a separate text file whose syntax is exemplified below.
205
206 #### Adding a trace file ####
207
208 \verbatim
209 <platform version="1">
210   <host id="bob" power="500000000" availability_file="bob.trace" />
211 </platform>
212 \endverbatim
213
214 #### Example of "bob.trace" file ####
215
216 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~{.py}
217 PERIODICITY 1.0
218   0.0 1.0
219   11.0 0.5
220   20.0 0.8
221 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
222
223 Let us begin to explain this example by looking at line 2. (Line 1 will become clear soon).
224 The first column describes points in time, in this case, time 0. The second column
225 describes the relative amount of power this host is able to deliver (relative
226 to the maximum performance specified in the ``\<host\>`` tag). (Clearly, the
227 second column needs to contain values that are not smaller than 0 and not larger than 1).
228 In this example, our host will deliver 500 Mflop/s at time 0, as 500 Mflop/s is the
229 maximum performance of this host. At time 11.0, it will
230 deliver half of its maximum performance, i.e., 250 Mflop/s until time 20.0 when it will
231 will start delivering 80\% of its power. In this example, this amounts to 400 Mflop/s.
232
233 Since the periodicity in line 1 was set to be 1.0, i.e., 1 timestep, this host will
234 continue to provide 500 Mflop/s from time 21. From time 32 it will provide 250 MFlop/s and so on.
235
236 ### Changing initial state ###
237
238 It is also possible to specify whether the host is up or down by setting the
239 ``state`` attribute to either <b>ON</b> (default value) or <b>OFF</b>.
240
241 #### Example: Expliciting the default value "ON" ####
242
243 \verbatim
244 <platform version="1">
245    <host id="bob" power="500000000" state="ON" />
246 </platform>
247 \endverbatim
248
249 If you want this host to be unavailable, simply substitute ON with OFF.
250
251 \anchor pf_host_churn
252 ### Expressing churn ###
253
254 To express the fact that a host can change state over time (as in P2P
255 systems, for instance), it is possible to use a file describing the time
256 at which the host is turned on or off. An example of the content
257 of such a file is presented below.
258
259 #### Adding a state file ####
260
261 \verbatim
262 <platform version="1">
263   <host id="bob" power="500000000" state_file="bob.fail" />
264 </platform>
265 \endverbatim
266
267 #### Example of "bob.fail" file ####
268
269 ~~~{.py}
270   PERIODICITY 10.0
271   1.0 -1.0
272   2.0 1.0
273 ~~~
274
275 A negative value means <b>down</b> (i.e., OFF) while a positive one means <b>up and
276   running</b> (i.e., ON). From time 0.0 to time 1.0, the host is on. At time 1.0, it is
277 turned off and at time 2.0, it is turned on again until time 12 (2.0 plus the
278 periodicity 10.0). It will be turned on again at time 13.0 until time 23.0, and
279 so on.
280
281
282 \subsubsection pf_cluster &lt;cluster&gt;
283
284 ``<cluster />`` represents a machine-cluster. It is most commonly used
285 when one wants to define many hosts and a network quickly. Technically,
286 ``cluster`` is a meta-tag: <b>from the inner SimGrid point of
287 view, a cluster is an AS where some optimized routing is defined</b>.
288 The default inner organization of the cluster is as follow:
289
290 \verbatim
291                  __________
292                 |          |
293                 |  router  |
294     ____________|__________|_____________ backbone
295       |   |   |              |     |   |
296     l0| l1| l2|           l97| l96 |   | l99
297       |   |   |   ........   |     |   |
298       |                                |
299     c-0.me                             c-99.me
300 \endverbatim
301
302 Here, a set of <b>host</b>s is defined. Each of them has a <b>link</b>
303 to a central backbone (backbone is a link itself, as a link can
304 be used to represent a switch, see the switch / link section
305 below for more details about it). A <b>router</b> allows to connect a
306 <b>cluster</b> to the outside world. Internally,
307 SimGrid treats a cluster as an AS containing all hosts: the router is the default
308 gateway for the cluster.
309
310 There is an alternative organization, which is as follows:
311 \verbatim
312                  __________
313                 |          |
314                 |  router  |
315                 |__________|
316                     / | \
317                    /  |  \
318                l0 / l1|   \l2
319                  /    |    \
320                 /     |     \
321             host0   host1   host2
322 \endverbatim
323
324 The principle is the same, except that there is no backbone. This representation
325 can be obtained easily: just do not set the bb_* attributes.
326
327
328 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
329 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
330 id              | yes       | string | The identifier of the cluster. Facilitates referring to this cluster.
331 prefix          | yes       | string | Each node of the cluster has to have a name. This name will be prefixed with this prefix.
332 suffix          | yes       | string | Each node of the cluster will be suffixed with this suffix
333 radical         | yes       | string | Regexp used to generate cluster nodes name. Syntax: "10-20" will give you 11 machines numbered from 10 to 20, "10-20;2" will give you 12 machines, one with the number 2, others numbered as before. The produced number is concatenated between prefix and suffix to form machine names.
334 power           | yes       | int    | Same as the ``power`` attribute of the ``\<host\>`` tag.
335 core            | no        | int (default: 1) | Same as the ``core`` attribute of the ``\<host\>`` tag.
336 bw              | yes       | int    | Bandwidth for the links between nodes and backbone (if any). See the \ref pf_link "link section" for syntax/details.
337 lat             | yes       | int    | Latency for the links between nodes and backbone (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details.
338 sharing_policy  | no        | string | Sharing policy for the links between nodes and backbone (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details.
339 bb_bw           | no        | int    | Bandwidth for backbone (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details. If bb_bw and bb_lat (see below) attributes are omitted, no backbone is created (alternative cluster architecture <b>described before</b>).
340 bb_lat          | no        | int    | Latency for backbone (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details. If bb_lat and bb_bw (see above) attributes are omitted, no backbone is created (alternative cluster architecture <b>described before</b>).
341 bb_sharing_policy | no      | string | Sharing policy for the backbone (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details.
342 availability_file | no      | string | Allows you to use a file as input for availability. Similar to <b>hosts</b> attribute.
343 state_file        | no      | string | Allows you to use a file as input for states.  Similar to <b>hosts</b> attribute.
344 loopback_bw       | no      | int    | Bandwidth for loopback (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details. If loopback_bw and loopback_lat (see below) attributes are omitted, no loopback link is created and all intra-node communication will use the main network link of the node. Loopback link is a \ref pf_sharing_policy_fatpipe "\b FATPIPE".
345 loopback_lat      | no      | int    | Latency for loopback (if any). See <b>link</b> section for syntax/details. See loopback_bw for more info.
346 topology          | no      | FLAT\|TORUS\|FAT_TREE (default: FLAT) | Network topology to use. SimGrid currently supports FLAT (with or without backbone, as described before), <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torus_interconnect">TORUS </a> and FAT_TREE attributes for this tag.
347 topo_parameters   | no      | string | Specific parameters to pass for the topology defined in the topology tag. For torus networks, comma-separated list of the number of nodes in each dimension of the torus. For fat trees, refer to \ref AsClusterFatTree "AsClusterFatTree documentation".
348
349 TODO
350
351 the router name is defined as the resulting String in the following
352 java line of code:
353
354 @verbatim
355 router_name = prefix + clusterId + _router + suffix;
356 @endverbatim
357
358
359 #### Cluster example ####
360
361 Consider the following two (and independent) uses of the ``cluster`` tag:
362
363 \verbatim
364 <cluster id="my_cluster_1" prefix="" suffix="" radical="0-262144"
365          power="1e9" bw="125e6" lat="5E-5"/>
366
367 <cluster id="my_cluster_2" prefix="c-" suffix=".me" radical="0-99"
368          power="1e9" bw="125e6" lat="5E-5"
369          bb_bw="2.25e9" bb_lat="5E-4"/>
370 \endverbatim
371
372 The second example creates one router and 100 machines with the following names:
373 \verbatim
374 c-my_cluster_2_router.me
375 c-0.me
376 c-1.me
377 c-2.me
378 ...
379 c-99.me
380 \endverbatim
381
382 \subsubsection pf_cabinet &lt;cabinet&gt;
383
384 \note
385     This tag is only available when the routing mode of the AS
386     is set to ``Cluster``.
387
388 The ``&lt;cabinet /&gt;`` tag is, like the \ref pf_cluster "&lt;cluster&gt;" tag,
389 a meta-tag. This means that it is simply a shortcut for creating a set of (homogenous) hosts and links quickly;
390 unsurprisingly, this tag was introduced to setup cabinets in data centers quickly. Unlike
391 &lt;cluster&gt;, however, the &lt;cabinet&gt; assumes that you create the backbone
392 and routers yourself; see our examples below.
393
394 #### Attributes ####
395
396 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
397 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
398 id              | yes       | string | The identifier of the cabinet. Facilitates referring to this cluster.
399 prefix          | yes       | string | Each node of the cabinet has to have a name. This name will be prefixed with this prefix.
400 suffix          | yes       | string | Each node of the cabinet will be suffixed with this suffix
401 radical         | yes       | string | Regexp used to generate cabinet nodes name. Syntax: "10-20" will give you 11 machines numbered from 10 to 20, "10-20;2" will give you 12 machines, one with the number 2, others numbered as before. The produced number is concatenated between prefix and suffix to form machine names.
402 power           | yes       | int    | Same as the ``power`` attribute of the \ref pf_host "&lt;host&gt;" tag.
403 bw              | yes       | int    | Bandwidth for the links between nodes and backbone (if any). See the \ref pf_link "link section" for syntax/details.
404 lat             | yes       | int    | Latency for the links between nodes and backbone (if any). See the \ref pf_link "link section" for syntax/details.
405
406 \note
407     Please note that as of now, it is impossible to change attributes such as,
408     amount of cores (always set to 1), the initial state of hosts/links
409     (always set to ON), the sharing policy of the links (always set to \ref pf_sharing_policy_fullduplex "FULLDUPLEX").
410
411 #### Example ####
412
413 The following example was taken from ``examples/platforms/meta_cluster.xml`` and
414 shows how to use the cabinet tag.
415
416 \verbatim
417   <AS  id="my_cluster1"  routing="Cluster">
418     <cabinet id="cabinet1" prefix="host-" suffix=".cluster1"
419       power="1Gf" bw="125MBps" lat="100us" radical="1-10"/>
420     <cabinet id="cabinet2" prefix="host-" suffix=".cluster1"
421       power="1Gf" bw="125MBps" lat="100us" radical="11-20"/>
422     <cabinet id="cabinet3" prefix="host-" suffix=".cluster1"
423       power="1Gf" bw="125MBps" lat="100us" radical="21-30"/>
424
425     <backbone id="backbone1" bandwidth="2.25GBps" latency="500us"/>
426   </AS>
427 \endverbatim
428
429 \note
430    Please note that you must specify the \ref pf_backbone "&lt;backbone&gt;"
431    tag by yourself; this is not done automatically and there are no checks
432    that ensure this backbone was defined.
433
434 The hosts generated in the above example are named host-1.cluster, host-2.cluster1
435 etc.
436
437
438 \subsubsection pf_peer The &lt;peer&gt; tag
439
440 This tag represents a peer, as in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks. However, internally,
441 SimGrid transforms a peer into an AS (similar to Cluster). Hence, this tag
442 is virtually only a shortcut that comes with some pre-defined resources
443 and values. These are:
444
445 \li A tiny AS whose routing type is cluster is created
446 \li A host
447 \li Two links: One for download and one for upload. This is
448     convenient to use and simulate stuff under the last mile model (e.g., ADSL peers).
449 \li It connects the two links to the host
450 \li It creates a router (a gateway) that serves as an entry point for this peer zone.
451     This router has coordinates.
452
453 #### Attributes ####
454
455 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
456 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
457 id              | yes       | string | The identifier of the peer. Facilitates referring to this peer.
458 power           | yes       | int    | See the description of the ``host`` tag for this attribute
459 bw_in           | yes       | int    | Bandwidth downstream
460 bw_out          | yes       | int    | Bandwidth upstream
461 lat             | yes       | double | Latency for both up- and downstream, in seconds.
462 coordinates     | no        | string | Coordinates of the gateway for this peer. Example value: 12.8 14.4 6.4
463 sharing_policy  | no        | SHARED\|FULLDUPLEX (default: FULLDUPLEX) | Sharing policy for links. See <b>link</b> description for details.
464 availability_file| no       | string | Availability file for the peer. Same as host availability file. See <b>host</b> description for details.
465 state_file      | no        | string | State file for the peer. Same as host state file. See <b>host</b> description for details.
466
467 Internally, SimGrid transforms any ``\<peer/\>`` construct such as
468 \verbatim
469 <peer id="FOO"
470   coordinates="12.8 14.4 6.4"
471   power="1.5Gf"
472   bw_in="2.25GBps"
473   bw_out="2.25GBps"
474   lat="500us" />
475 \endverbatim
476 into an ``\<AS\>`` (see Sections \ref pf_basics and \ref pf_As). In fact, this example of the ``\<peer/\>`` tag
477 is completely equivalent to the following declaration:
478
479 \verbatim
480 <AS id="as_FOO" routing="Cluster">
481    <host id="peer_FOO" power="1.5Gf"/>
482    <link id="link_FOO_UP" bandwidth="2.25GBps" latency="500us"/>
483    <link id="link_FOO_DOWN" bandwidth="2.25GBps" latency="500us"/>
484    <router id="router_FOO" coordinates="25.5 9.4 1.4"/>
485    <host_link id="peer_FOO" up="link_FOO_UP" down="link_FOO_DOWN"/>
486 </AS>
487 \endverbatim
488
489
490 \subsection pf_ne Network equipments: links and routers
491
492 There are two tags at all times available to represent network entities and
493 several other tags that are available only in certain contexts.
494 1. ``<link>``: Represents a entity that has a limited bandwidth, a
495     latency, and that can be shared according to TCP way to share this
496     bandwidth.
497 \remark
498   The concept of links in SimGrid may not be intuitive, as links are not
499   limited to connecting (exactly) two entities; in fact, you can have more than
500   two equipments connected to it. (In graph theoretical terms: A link in
501   SimGrid is not an edge, but a hyperedge)
502
503 2. ``<router/>``: Represents an entity that a message can be routed
504     to, but that is unable to execute any code. In SimGrid, routers have also
505     no impact on the performance: Routers do not limit any bandwidth nor
506     do they increase latency. As a matter of fact, routers are (almost) ignored
507     by the simulator when the simulation has begun.
508
509 3. ``<backbone/>``: This tag is only available when the containing AS is
510                     used as a cluster (i.e., mode="Cluster")
511
512 \remark
513     If you want to represent an entity like a switch, you must use ``<link>`` (see section). Routers are used
514     to run some routing algorithm and determine routes (see Section \ref pf_routing for details).
515
516 \subsubsection pf_router &lt;router/&gt;
517
518 %As said before, <b>router</b> is used only to give some information
519 for routing algorithms. So, it does not have any attributes except :
520
521 #### Attributes ####
522
523 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
524 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
525 id              | yes       | string | The identifier of the router to be used when referring to it.
526 coordinates     | yes       | string | Must be provided when choosing the Vivaldi, coordinate-based routing model for the AS the router belongs to. More details can be found in the Section \ref pf_P2P_tags.
527
528 #### Example ####
529
530 \verbatim
531  <router id="gw_dc1_horizdist"/>
532 \endverbatim
533
534 \subsubsection pf_link &lt;link/&gt;
535
536 Network links can represent one-hop network connections. They are
537 characterized by their id and their bandwidth; links can (but may not) be subject
538 to latency.
539
540 #### Attributes ####
541
542 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
543 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
544 id              | yes       | string | The identifier of the link to be used when referring to it.
545 bandwidth       | yes       | int    | Maximum bandwidth for this link, given in bytes/s
546 latency         | no        | double (default: 0.0) | Latency for this link.
547 sharing_policy  | no        | \ref sharing_policy_shared "SHARED"\|\ref pf_sharing_policy_fatpipe "FATPIPE"\|\ref pf_sharing_policy_fullduplex "FULLDUPLEX" (default: SHARED) | Sharing policy for the link.
548 state           | no        | ON\|OFF (default: ON) | Allows you to to turn this link on or off (working / not working)
549 bandwidth_file  | no        | string | Allows you to use a file as input for bandwidth.
550 latency_file    | no        | string | Allows you to use a file as input for latency.
551 state_file      | no        | string | Allows you to use a file as input for states.
552
553
554 #### Possible shortcuts for ``latency`` ####
555
556 When using the latency attribute, you can specify the latency by using the scientific
557 notation or by using common abbreviations. For instance, the following three tags
558 are equivalent:
559
560 \verbatim
561  <link id="LINK1" bandwidth="125000000" latency="5E-6"/>
562  <link id="LINK1" bandwidth="125000000" latency="5us"/>
563  <link id="LINK1" bandwidth="125000000" latency="0.000005"/>
564 \endverbatim
565
566 Here, the second tag uses "us", meaning "microseconds". Other shortcuts are:
567
568 Name | Abbreviation | Time (in seconds)
569 ---- | ------------ | -----------------
570 Week | w | 7 * 24 * 60 * 60
571 Day  | d | 24 * 60 * 60
572 Hour | h | 60 * 60
573 Minute | m | 60
574 Second | s | 1
575 Millisecond | ms | 0.001 = 10^(-3)
576 Microsecond | us | 0.000001 = 10^(-6)
577 Nanosecond  | ns | 0.000000001 = 10^(-9)
578 Picosecond  | ps | 0.000000000001 = 10^(-12)
579
580 #### Sharing policy ####
581
582 \anchor sharing_policy_shared
583 By default a network link is \b SHARED, i.e., if two or more data flows go
584 through a link, the bandwidth is shared fairly among all data flows. This
585 is similar to the sharing policy TCP uses.
586
587 \anchor pf_sharing_policy_fatpipe
588 On the other hand, if a link is defined as a \b FATPIPE,
589 each flow going through this link will be provided with the complete bandwidth,
590 i.e., no sharing occurs and the bandwidth is only limiting each flow individually.
591 Please note that this is really on a per-flow basis, not only on a per-host basis!
592 The complete bandwidth provided by this link in this mode
593 is ``number_of_flows*bandwidth``, with at most ``bandwidth`` being available per flow.
594
595 Using the FATPIPE mode allows to model backbones that won't affect performance
596 (except latency).
597
598 \anchor pf_sharing_policy_fullduplex
599 The last mode available is \b FULLDUPLEX. This means that SimGrid will
600 automatically generate two links (one carrying the suffix _UP and the other the
601 suffix _DOWN) for each ``<link>`` tag. This models situations when the direction
602 of traffic is important.
603
604 \remark
605   Transfers from one side to the other will interact similarly as
606   TCP when ACK returning packets circulate on the other direction. More
607   discussion about it is available in the description of link_ctn description.
608
609 In other words: The SHARED policy defines a physical limit for the bandwidth.
610 The FATPIPE mode defines a limit for each application,
611 with no upper total limit.
612
613 \remark
614   Tip: By using the FATPIPE mode, you can model big backbones that
615   won't affect performance (except latency).
616
617 #### Example ####
618
619 \verbatim
620  <link id="SWITCH" bandwidth="125000000" latency="5E-5" sharing_policy="FATPIPE" />
621 \endverbatim
622
623 #### Expressing dynamism and failures ####
624
625 Similar to hosts, it is possible to declare links whose state, bandwidth
626 or latency changes over time (see Section \ref pf_host_dynamism for details).
627
628 In the case of network links, the ``bandwidth`` and ``latency`` attributes are
629 replaced by the ``bandwidth_file`` and ``latency_file`` attributes.
630 The following XML snippet demonstrates how to use this feature in the platform
631 file. The structure of the files "link1.bw" and "link1.lat" is shown below.
632
633 \verbatim
634 <link id="LINK1" state_file="link1.fail" bandwidth="80000000" latency=".0001" bandwidth_file="link1.bw" latency_file="link1.lat" />
635 \endverbatim
636
637 \note
638   Even if the syntax is the same, the semantic of bandwidth and latency
639   trace files differs from that of host availability files. For bandwidth and
640   latency, the corresponding files do not
641   express availability as a fraction of the available capacity but directly in
642   bytes per seconds for the bandwidth and in seconds for the latency. This is
643   because most tools allowing to capture traces on real platforms (such as NWS)
644   express their results this way.
645
646 ##### Example of "link1.bw" file #####
647
648 ~~~{.py}
649 PERIODICITY 12.0
650 4.0 40000000
651 8.0 60000000
652 ~~~
653
654 In this example, the bandwidth changes repeatedly, with all changes
655 being repeated every 12 seconds.
656
657 At the beginning of the the simulation, the link's bandwidth is 80,000,000
658 B/s (i.e., 80 Mb/s); this value was defined in the XML snippet above.
659 After four seconds, it drops to 40 Mb/s (line 2), and climbs
660 back to 60 Mb/s after another 4 seconds (line 3). The value does not change any
661 more until the end of the period, that is, after 12 seconds have been simulated).
662 At this point, periodicity kicks in and this behavior is repeated: Seconds
663 12-16 will experience 80 Mb/s, 16-20 40 Mb/s etc.).
664
665 ##### Example of "link1.lat" file #####
666
667 ~~~{.py}
668 PERIODICITY 5.0
669 1.0 0.001
670 2.0 0.01
671 3.0 0.001
672 ~~~
673
674 In this example, the latency varies with a period of 5 seconds.
675 In the xml snippet above, the latency is initialized to be 0.0001s (100µs). This
676 value will be kept during the first second, since the latency_file contains
677 changes to this value at second one, two and three.
678 At second one, the value will be 0.001, i.e., 1ms. One second later it will
679 be adjusted to 0.01 (or 10ms) and one second later it will be set again to 1ms. The
680 value will not change until second 5, when the periodicity defined in line 1
681 kicks in. It then loops back, starting at 100µs (the initial value) for one second.
682
683
684 #### The ``<prop/>`` tag ####
685
686 Similar to ``\<host\>``, the link may also contain the ``<prop/>`` tag; see the host
687 documentation (Section \ref pf_host) for an example.
688
689
690 TODO
691
692 \subsubsection pf_backbone <backbone/>
693
694 \note
695   This tag is <b>only available</b> when the containing AS uses the "Cluster" mode!
696
697 Using this tag, you can designate an already existing link to be a backbone.
698
699 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
700 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
701 id              | yes       | string | Name of the link that is supposed to act as a backbone.
702
703 \subsection pf_storage Storage
704
705 \note
706   This is a prototype version that should evolve quickly, hence this
707   is just some doc valuable only at the time of writing.
708   This section describes the storage management under SimGrid ; nowadays
709   it's only usable with MSG. It relies basically on linux-like concepts.
710   You also may want to have a look to its corresponding section in \ref
711   msg_file_management ; access functions are organized as a POSIX-like
712   interface.
713
714 \subsubsection pf_sto_conc Storage Main concepts
715 Basically there are 3 different entities available in SimGrid that
716 can be used to model storage:
717
718 Entity name     | Description
719 --------------- | -----------
720 \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "storage_type"    | Defines a template for a particular kind of storage (such as a hard-drive) and specifies important features of the storage, such as capacity, performance (read/write), contents, ... Different models of hard-drives use different storage_types (because the difference between an SSD and an HDD does matter), as they differ in some specifications (e.g., different sizes or read/write performance).
721 \ref pf_storage_entity_storage "storage"        | Defines an actual instance of a storage type (disk, RAM, ...); uses a ``storage_type`` template (see line above) so that you don't need to re-specify the same details over and over again.
722 \ref pf_storage_entity_mount "mount"          | Must be wrapped by a \ref pf_host tag; declares which storage(s) this host has mounted and where (i.e., the mountpoint).
723
724
725 \anchor pf_storage_content_file
726 ### %Storage Content File ###
727
728 In order to assess exactly how much time is spent reading from the storage,
729 SimGrid needs to know what is stored on the storage device (identified by distinct (file-)name, like in a file system)
730 and what size this content has.
731
732 \note
733     The content file is never changed by the simulation; it is parsed once
734     per simulation and kept in memory afterwards. When the content of the
735     storage changes, only the internal SimGrid data structures change.
736
737 \anchor pf_storage_content_file_structure
738 #### Structure of a %Storage Content File ####
739
740 Here is an excerpt from two storage content file; if you want to see the whole file, check
741 the file ``examples/platforms/content/storage_content.txt`` that comes with the
742 SimGrid source code.
743
744 SimGrid essentially supports two different formats: UNIX-style filepaths should
745 follow the well known format:
746
747 \verbatim
748 /lib/libsimgrid.so.3.6.2  12710497
749 /bin/smpicc  918
750 /bin/smpirun  7292
751 /bin/smpif2c  1990
752 /bin/simgrid_update_xml  5018
753 /bin/graphicator  66986
754 /bin/simgrid-colorizer  2993
755 /bin/smpiff  820
756 /bin/tesh  356434
757 \endverbatim
758
759 Windows filepaths, unsurprisingly, use the windows style:
760
761 \verbatim
762 \Windows\avastSS.scr 41664
763 \Windows\bfsvc.exe 75264
764 \Windows\bootstat.dat 67584
765 \Windows\CoreSingleLanguage.xml 31497
766 \Windows\csup.txt 12
767 \Windows\dchcfg64.exe 335464
768 \Windows\dcmdev64.exe 93288
769 \endverbatim
770
771 \note
772     The different file formats come at a cost; in version 3.12 (and most likely
773     in later versions, too), copying files from windows-style storages to unix-style
774     storages (and vice versa) is not supported.
775
776 \anchor pf_storage_content_file_create
777 #### Generate a %Storage Content File ####
778
779 If you want to generate a storage content file based on your own filesystem (or at least a filesystem you have access to),
780 try running this command (works only on unix systems):
781
782 \verbatim
783 find . -type f -exec ls -1s --block=1 {} \; 2>/dev/null | awk '{ print $2 " " $1}' > ./content.txt
784 \endverbatim
785
786 \subsubsection pf_storage_entities The Storage Entities
787
788 These are the entities that you can use in your platform files to include
789 storage in your model. See also the list of our \ref pf_storage_example_files "example files";
790 these might also help you to get started.
791
792 \anchor pf_storage_entity_storage_type
793 #### \<storage_type\> ####
794
795 Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description
796 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
797 id              | yes       | string | Identifier of this storage_type; used when referring to it
798 model           | yes       | string | For reasons of future backwards compatibility only; specifies the name of the model for the storage that should be used
799 size            | yes       | string | Specifies the amount of available storage space; you can specify storage like "500GiB" or "500GB" if you want. (TODO add a link to all the available abbreviations)
800 content         | yes       | string | Path to a \ref pf_storage_content_file "Storage Content File" on your system. This file must exist.
801 content_type    | no        | ("txt_unix"\|"txt_win") | Determines which kind of filesystem you're using; make sure the filenames (stored in that file, see \ref pf_storage_content_file_structure "Storage Content File Structure"!)
802
803 This tag must contain some predefined model properties, specified via the &lt;model_prop&gt; tag. Here is a list,
804 see below for an example:
805
806 Property id     | Mandatory | Values | Description
807 --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
808 Bwrite          | yes       | string | Bandwidth for write access; in B/s (but you can also specify e.g. "30MBps")
809 Bread           | yes       | string | Bandwidth for read access; in B/s (but you can also specify e.g. "30MBps")
810 Bconnexion      | yes       | string | Throughput (of the storage connector) in B/s.
811
812 \note
813      A storage_type can also contain the <b>&lt;prop&gt;</b> tag. The &lt;prop&gt; tag allows you
814      to associate additional information to this &lt;storage_type&gt; and follows the
815      attribute/value schema; see the example below. You may want to use it to give information to
816      the tool you use for rendering your simulation, for example.
817
818 Here is a complete example for the ``storage_type`` tag:
819 \verbatim
820 <storage_type id="single_HDD" model="linear_no_lat" size="4000" content_type="txt_unix">
821   <model_prop id="Bwrite" value="30MBps" />
822   <model_prop id="Bread" value="100MBps" />
823   <model_prop id="Bconnection" value="150MBps" />
824   <prop id="Brand" value="Western Digital" />
825 </storage_type>
826 \endverbatim
827
828 \anchor pf_storage_entity_storage
829 #### &lt;storage&gt; ####
830
831 ``storage`` attributes:
832
833 Attribute name | Mandatory | Values | Description
834 -------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------
835 id             | yes       | string | Identifier of this ``storage``; used when referring to it
836 typeId         | yes       | string | Here you need to refer to an already existing \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "\<storage_type\>"; the storage entity defined by this tag will then inherit the properties defined there.
837 attach         | yes       | string | Name of a host (see Section \ref pf_host) to which this storage is <i>physically</i> attached to (e.g., a hard drive in a computer)
838 content        | no        | string | When specified, overwrites the content attribute of \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "\<storage_type\>"
839 content_type   | no        | string | When specified, overwrites the content_type attribute of \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "\<storage_type\>"
840
841 Here are two examples:
842
843 \verbatim
844      <storage id="Disk1" typeId="single_HDD" attach="bob" />
845
846      <storage id="Disk2" typeId="single_SSD"
847               content="content/win_storage_content.txt"
848               content_type="txt_windows" attach="alice" />
849 \endverbatim
850
851 The first example is straightforward: A disk is defined and called "Disk1"; it is
852 of type "single_HDD" (shown as an example of \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "\<storage_type\>" above) and attached
853 to a host called "bob" (the definition of this host is omitted here).
854
855 The second storage is called "Disk2", is still of the same type as Disk1 but
856 now specifies a new content file (so the contents will be different from Disk1)
857 and the filesystem uses the windows style; finally, it is attached to a second host,
858 called alice (which is again not defined here).
859
860 \anchor pf_storage_entity_mount
861 #### &lt;mount&gt; ####
862
863 Attributes:
864 | Attribute name   | Mandatory   | Values   | Description                                                                                               |
865 | ---------------- | ----------- | -------- | -------------                                                                                             |
866 | id               | yes         | string   | Refers to a \ref pf_storage_entity_storage "&lt;storage&gt;" entity that will be mounted on that computer |
867 | name             | yes         | string   | Path/location to/of the logical reference (mount point) of this disk
868
869 This tag must be enclosed by a \ref pf_host tag. It then specifies where the mountpoint of a given storage device (defined by the ``id`` attribute)
870 is; this location is specified by the ``name`` attribute.
871
872 Here is a simple example, taken from the file ``examples/platform/storage.xml``:
873
874 \verbatim
875     <storage_type id="single_SSD" model="linear_no_lat" size="500GiB">
876        <model_prop id="Bwrite" value="60MBps" />
877        <model_prop id="Bread" value="200MBps" />
878        <model_prop id="Bconnection" value="220MBps" />
879     </storage_type>
880
881     <storage id="Disk2" typeId="single_SSD"
882               content="content/win_storage_content.txt"
883               content_type="txt_windows" attach="alice" />
884     <storage id="Disk4" typeId="single_SSD"
885              content="content/small_content.txt"
886              content_type="txt_unix" attach="denise"/>
887
888     <host id="alice" power="1Gf">
889       <mount storageId="Disk2" name="c:"/>
890     </host>
891
892     <host id="denise" power="1Gf">
893       <mount storageId="Disk2" name="c:"/>
894       <mount storageId="Disk4" name="/home"/>
895     </host>
896 \endverbatim
897
898 This example is quite interesting, as the same device, called "Disk2", is mounted by
899 two hosts at the same time! Note, however, that the host called ``alice`` is actually
900 attached to this storage, as can be seen in the \ref pf_storage_entity_storage "&lt;storage&gt;"
901 tag. This means that ``denise`` must access this storage through the network, but SimGrid automatically takes
902 care of that for you.
903
904 Furthermore, this example shows that ``denise`` has mounted two storages with different
905 filesystem types (unix and windows). In general, a host can mount as many storage devices as
906 required.
907
908 \note
909     Again, the difference between ``attach`` and ``mount`` is simply that
910     an attached storage is always physically inside (or connected to) that machine;
911     for instance, a USB stick is attached to one and only one machine (where it's plugged-in)
912     but it can only be mounted on others, as mounted storage can also be a remote location.
913
914 ###### Example files #####
915
916 \verbinclude example_filelist_xmltag_mount
917
918 \anchor pf_storage_entity_mstorage
919 #### &lt;mstorage&gt; ####
920 \note
921     This is currently unused.
922
923 <b>mstorage</b> attributes :
924 \li <b>typeId (mandatory)</b>: the id of the <b>storage</b> that must
925     be mounted on that computer.
926 \li <b>name (mandatory)</b>: the name that will be the logical
927     reference to this disk (the mount point).
928
929 \subsubsection pf_storage_example_files Example files
930
931 Several examples were already discussed above; if you're interested in full examples,
932 check the the following platforms:
933
934 1. ``examples/platforms/storage.xml``
935 2. ``examples/platforms/remote_io.xml``
936
937 If you're looking for some examplary C code, you may find the source code
938 available in the directory ``examples/msg/io/`` useful.
939
940 \subsubsection pf_storage_examples_modelling Modelling different situations
941
942 The storage functionality of SimGrid is type-agnostic, that is, the implementation
943 does not presume any type of storagei, such as HDDs/SSDs, RAM,
944 CD/DVD devices, USB sticks etc.
945
946 This allows the user to apply the simulator for a wide variety of scenarios; one
947 common scenario would be the access of remote RAM.
948
949 #### Modelling the access of remote RAM ####
950
951 How can this be achieved in SimGrid? Let's assume we have a setup where three hosts
952 (HostA, HostB, HostC) need to access remote RAM:
953
954 \verbatim
955       Host A
956     /
957 RAM -- Host B
958     \
959       Host C
960 \endverbatim
961
962 An easy way to model this scenario is to setup and define the RAM via the
963 \ref pf_storage_entity_storage "storage" and \ref pf_storage_entity_storage_type "storage type"
964 entities and attach it to a remote dummy host; then, every host can have their own links
965 to this host (modelling for instance certain scenarios, such as PCIe ...)
966
967 \verbatim
968               Host A
969             /
970 RAM - Dummy -- Host B
971             \
972               Host C
973 \endverbatim
974
975 Now, if read from this storage, the host that mounts this storage
976 communicates to the dummy host which reads from RAM and
977 sends the information back.
978
979
980 \section pf_routing Routing
981
982 To achieve high performance, the routing tables used within SimGrid are
983 static. This means that routing between two nodes is calculated once
984 and will not change during execution. The SimGrid team chose to use this
985 approach as it is rare to have a real deficiency of a resource;
986 most of the time, a communication fails because the links experience too much
987 congestion and hence, your connection stops before the timeout or
988 because the computer designated to be the destination of that message
989 is not responding.
990
991 We also chose to use shortest paths algorithms in order to emulate
992 routing. Doing so is consistent with the reality: [RIP](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Routing_Information_Protocol),
993 [OSPF](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Shortest_Path_First), [BGP](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Border_Gateway_Protocol)
994 are all calculating shortest paths. They do require some time to converge, but
995 eventually, when the routing tables have stabilized, your packets will follow
996 the shortest paths.
997
998 \subsection pf_rm Routing models
999
1000 For each AS, you must define explicitly which routing model will
1001 be used. There are 3 different categories for routing models:
1002
1003 1. \ref pf_routing_model_shortest_path "Shortest-path" based models: SimGrid calculates shortest
1004    paths and manages them. Behaves more or less like most real life
1005    routing mechanisms.
1006 2. \ref pf_routing_model_manual "Manually-entered" route models: you have to define all routes
1007    manually in the platform description file; this can become
1008    tedious very quickly, as it is very verbose.
1009    Consistent with some manually managed real life routing.
1010 3. \ref pf_routing_model_simple "Simple/fast models": those models offer fast, low memory routing
1011    algorithms. You should consider to use this type of model if 
1012    you can make some assumptions about your AS. 
1013    Routing in this case is more or less ignored.
1014
1015 \subsubsection pf_raf The router affair
1016
1017 Using routers becomes mandatory when using shortest-path based
1018 models or when using the bindings to the ns-3 packet-level
1019 simulator instead of the native analytical network model implemented
1020 in SimGrid.
1021
1022 For graph-based shortest path algorithms, routers are mandatory, because these
1023 algorithms require a graph as input and so we need to have source and
1024 destination for each edge.
1025
1026 Routers are naturally an important concept ns-3 since the
1027 way routers run the packet routing algorithms is actually simulated.
1028 SimGrid's analytical models however simply aggregate the routing time
1029 with the transfer time. 
1030
1031 So why did we incorporate routers in SimGrid? Rebuilding a graph representation
1032 only from the route information turns out to be a very difficult task, because
1033 of the missing information about how routes intersect. That is why we
1034 introduced routers, which are simply used to express these intersection points.
1035 It is important to understand that routers are only used to provide topological
1036 information.
1037
1038 To express this topological information, a <b>route</b> has to be
1039 defined in order to declare which link is connected to a router. 
1040
1041
1042 \subsubsection pf_routing_model_shortest_path Shortest-path based models
1043
1044 The following table shows all the models that compute routes using
1045 shortest-paths algorithms are currently available in SimGrid. More detail on how
1046 to choose the best routing model is given in the Section called \"\ref pf_routing_howto_choose_wisely\".
1047
1048 | Name                                                | Description                                                                |
1049 | --------------------------------------------------- | -------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
1050 | \ref pf_routing_model_floyd "Floyd"                 | Floyd routing data. Pre-calculates all routes once                         |
1051 | \ref pf_routing_model_dijkstra "Dijkstra"           | Dijkstra routing data. Calculates routes only when needed                  |
1052 | \ref pf_routing_model_dijkstracache "DijkstraCache" | Dijkstra routing data. Handles some cache for already calculated routes.   |
1053
1054 All those shortest-path models are instanciated in the same way and are
1055 completely interchangeable. Here are some examples:
1056
1057 \anchor pf_routing_model_floyd
1058 ### Floyd ###
1059
1060 Floyd example:
1061 \verbatim
1062 <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Floyd">
1063
1064   <cluster id="my_cluster_1" prefix="c-" suffix=""
1065            radical="0-1" power="1000000000" bw="125000000" lat="5E-5"
1066            router_id="router1"/>
1067
1068   <AS id="AS1" routing="None">
1069     <host id="host1" power="1000000000"/>
1070   </AS>
1071
1072   <link id="link1" bandwidth="100000" latency="0.01"/>
1073
1074   <ASroute src="my_cluster_1" dst="AS1"
1075     gw_src="router1"
1076     gw_dst="host1">
1077     <link_ctn id="link1"/>
1078   </ASroute>
1079
1080 </AS>
1081 \endverbatim
1082
1083 ASroute given at the end gives a topological information: link1 is
1084 between router1 and host1.
1085
1086 #### Example platform files ####
1087
1088 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the Floyd
1089 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory)
1090
1091 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_floyd
1092
1093 \anchor pf_routing_model_dijkstra
1094 ### Dijkstra ###
1095
1096 #### Example platform files ####
1097
1098 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the Dijkstra
1099 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory)
1100
1101 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_dijkstra
1102
1103 Dijsktra example :
1104 \verbatim
1105  <AS id="AS_2" routing="Dijsktra">
1106      <host id="AS_2_host1" power="1000000000"/>
1107      <host id="AS_2_host2" power="1000000000"/>
1108      <host id="AS_2_host3" power="1000000000"/>
1109      <link id="AS_2_link1" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1110      <link id="AS_2_link2" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1111      <link id="AS_2_link3" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1112      <link id="AS_2_link4" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1113      <router id="central_router"/>
1114      <router id="AS_2_gateway"/>
1115      <!-- routes providing topological information -->
1116      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host1"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link1"/></route>
1117      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host2"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link2"/></route>
1118      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host3"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link3"/></route>
1119      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_gateway"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link4"/></route>
1120   </AS>
1121 \endverbatim
1122
1123 \anchor pf_routing_model_dijkstracache
1124 ### DijkstraCache ###
1125
1126 DijsktraCache example:
1127 \verbatim
1128 <AS id="AS_2" routing="DijsktraCache">
1129      <host id="AS_2_host1" power="1000000000"/>
1130      ...
1131 (platform unchanged compared to upper example)
1132 \endverbatim
1133
1134 #### Example platform files ####
1135
1136 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the DijkstraCache
1137 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1138
1139 Editor's note: At the time of writing, no platform file used this routing model - so
1140 if there are no example files listed here, this is likely to be correct.
1141
1142 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_dijkstra_cache
1143
1144 \subsubsection pf_routing_model_manual Manually-entered route models
1145
1146 | Name                               | Description                                                                    |
1147 | ---------------------------------- | ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ |
1148 | \ref pf_routing_model_full "Full"  | You have to enter all necessary routers manually; that is, every single route. This may consume a lot of memory when the XML is parsed and might be tedious to write; i.e., this is only recommended (if at all) for small platforms. |
1149
1150 \anchor pf_routing_model_full
1151 ### Full ###
1152
1153 Full example :
1154 \verbatim
1155 <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Full">
1156    <host id="host1" power="1000000000"/>
1157    <host id="host2" power="1000000000"/>
1158    <link id="link1" bandwidth="125000000" latency="0.000100"/>
1159    <route src="host1" dst="host2"><link_ctn id="link1"/></route>
1160  </AS>
1161 \endverbatim
1162
1163 #### Example platform files ####
1164
1165 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the Full
1166 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1167
1168 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_full
1169
1170 \subsubsection pf_routing_model_simple Simple/fast models
1171
1172 | Name                                     | Description                                                                                                                         |
1173 | ---------------------------------------- | ------------------------------------------------------------------------------                                                      |
1174 | \ref pf_routing_model_cluster "Cluster"  | This is specific to the \ref pf_cluster "&lt;cluster/&gt;" tag and should not be used by the user, as several assumptions are made. |
1175 | \ref pf_routing_model_none    "None"     | No routing at all. Unless you know what you're doing, avoid using this mode in combination with a non-constant network model.       |
1176 | \ref pf_routing_model_vivaldi "Vivaldi"  | Perfect when you want to use coordinates. Also see the corresponding \ref pf_P2P_tags "P2P section" below.                          |
1177
1178 \anchor pf_routing_model_cluster
1179 ### Cluster ###
1180
1181 \note
1182  In this mode, the \ref pf_cabinet "&lt;cabinet/&gt;" tag is available.
1183
1184 #### Example platform files ####
1185
1186 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the Cluster
1187 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1188
1189 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_cluster
1190
1191 \anchor pf_routing_model_none
1192 ### None ###
1193
1194 This model does exactly what it's name advertises: Nothing. There is no routing
1195 available within this model and if you try to communicate within the AS that
1196 uses this model, SimGrid will fail unless you have explicitly activated the
1197 \ref options_model_select_network_constant "Constant Network Model" (this model charges
1198 the same for every single communication). It should
1199 be noted, however, that you can still attach an \ref pf_routing_tag_asroute "ASroute",
1200 as is demonstrated in the example below:
1201
1202 \verbinclude platforms/cluster_and_one_host.xml
1203
1204 #### Example platform files ####
1205
1206 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the None
1207 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1208
1209 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_none
1210
1211
1212 \anchor pf_routing_model_vivaldi
1213 ### Vivaldi ###
1214
1215 For more information on how to use the [Vivaldi Coordinates](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vivaldi_coordinates),
1216 see also Section \ref pf_P2P_tags "P2P tags".
1217
1218 For documentation on how to activate this model (as some initialization must be done
1219 in the simulator), see Section \ref options_model_network_coord "Activating Coordinate Based Routing".
1220
1221 Note that it is possible to combine the Vivaldi routing model with other routing models;
1222 an example can be found in the file \c examples/platforms/cloud.xml. This
1223 examples models an AS using Vivaldi that contains other ASes that use different
1224 routing models.
1225
1226 #### Example platform files ####
1227
1228 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the None
1229 routing model (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1230
1231 \verbinclude example_filelist_routing_vivaldi
1232
1233
1234 \subsection ps_dec Defining routes
1235
1236 There are currently four different ways to define routes: 
1237
1238 | Name                                              | Description                                                                         |
1239 | ------------------------------------------------- | ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- |
1240 | \ref pf_routing_tag_route "route"                 | Used to define route between host/router                                            |
1241 | \ref pf_routing_tag_asroute "ASroute"             | Used to define route between different AS                                           |
1242 | \ref pf_routing_tag_bypassroute "bypassRoute"     | Used to supersede normal routes as calculated by the network model between host/router; e.g., can be used to use a route that is not the shortest path for any of the shortest-path routing models. |
1243 | \ref pf_routing_tag_bypassasroute "bypassASroute"  | Used in the same way as bypassRoute, but for AS                                     |
1244
1245 Basically all those tags will contain an (ordered) list of references
1246 to link that compose the route you want to define.
1247
1248 Consider the example below:
1249
1250 \verbatim
1251 <route src="Alice" dst="Bob">
1252         <link_ctn id="link1"/>
1253         <link_ctn id="link2"/>
1254         <link_ctn id="link3"/>
1255 </route>
1256 \endverbatim
1257
1258 The route here from host Alice to Bob will be first link1, then link2,
1259 and finally link3. What about the reverse route? \ref pf_routing_tag_route "Route" and
1260 \ref pf_routing_tag_asroute "ASroute" have an optional attribute \c symmetrical, that can
1261 be either \c YES or \c NO. \c YES means that the reverse route is the same
1262 route in the inverse order, and is set to \c YES by default. Note that
1263 this is not the case for bypass*Route, as it is more probable that you
1264 want to bypass only one default route.
1265
1266 For an \ref pf_routing_tag_asroute "ASroute", things are just slightly more complicated, as you have
1267 to give the id of the gateway which is inside the AS you want to access ... 
1268 So it looks like this:
1269
1270 \verbatim
1271 <ASroute src="AS1" dst="AS2"
1272   gw_src="router1" gw_dst="router2">
1273   <link_ctn id="link1"/>
1274 </ASroute>
1275 \endverbatim
1276
1277 gw == gateway, so when any message are trying to go from AS1 to AS2,
1278 it means that it must pass through router1 to get out of the AS, then
1279 pass through link1, and get into AS2 by being received by router2.
1280 router1 must belong to AS1 and router2 must belong to AS2.
1281
1282 \subsubsection pf_linkctn &lt;link_ctn/&gt;
1283
1284 This entity has only one purpose: Refer to an already existing
1285 \ref pf_link "&lt;link/&gt;" when defining a route, i.e., it
1286 can only occur as a child of \ref pf_routing_tag_route "&lt;route/&gt;"
1287
1288 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description                                                   |
1289 | --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------                                                   |
1290 | id              | yes       | String | The identifier of the link that should be added to the route. |
1291 | direction       | maybe     | UP\|DOWN | If the link referenced by \c id has been declared as \ref pf_sharing_policy_fullduplex "FULLDUPLEX", this indicates which direction the route traverses through this link: UP or DOWN. If you don't use FULLDUPLEX, this attribute has no effect.
1292
1293 #### Example Files ####
1294
1295 This is an automatically generated list of example files that use the \c &lt;link_ctn/gt;
1296 entity (the path is given relative to SimGrid's source directory):
1297
1298 \verbinclude example_filelist_xmltag_linkctn
1299
1300 \subsubsection pf_routing_tag_asroute ASroute
1301
1302 The purpose of this entity is to define a route between two ASes.
1303 This is mainly useful when you're in the \ref pf_routing_model_full "Full routing model".
1304
1305 #### Attributes ####
1306
1307 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values | Description                                                                                                                                |
1308 | --------------- | --------- | ------ | -----------                                                                                                                                |
1309 | src             | yes       | String | The identifier of the source AS                                                                                                            |
1310 | dst             | yes       | String | See the \c src attribute                                                                                                                   |
1311 | gw_src          | yes       | String | The gateway that will be used within the src AS; this can be any \ref pf_host "Host" or \ref pf_router "Router" defined within the src AS. |
1312 | gw_dst          | yes       | String | Same as \c gw_src, but with the dst AS instead.                                                                                            |
1313 | symmetrical     | no        | YES\|NO (Default: YES) | If this route is symmetric, the opposite route (from dst to src) will also be declared implicitly.               | 
1314
1315 #### Example ####
1316
1317 \verbatim
1318 <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Full">
1319   <cluster id="my_cluster_1" prefix="c-" suffix=".me"
1320                 radical="0-149" power="1000000000"    bw="125000000"     lat="5E-5"
1321         bb_bw="2250000000" bb_lat="5E-4"/>
1322
1323   <cluster id="my_cluster_2" prefix="c-" suffix=".me"
1324             radical="150-299" power="1000000000"        bw="125000000"  lat="5E-5"
1325             bb_bw="2250000000" bb_lat="5E-4"/>
1326
1327      <link id="backbone" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1328
1329      <ASroute src="my_cluster_1" dst="my_cluster_2"
1330          gw_src="c-my_cluster_1_router.me"
1331          gw_dst="c-my_cluster_2_router.me">
1332                 <link_ctn id="backbone"/>
1333      </ASroute>
1334      <ASroute src="my_cluster_2" dst="my_cluster_1"
1335          gw_src="c-my_cluster_2_router.me"
1336          gw_dst="c-my_cluster_1_router.me">
1337                 <link_ctn id="backbone"/>
1338      </ASroute>
1339 </AS>
1340 \endverbatim
1341
1342 \subsubsection pf_routing_tag_route route 
1343
1344 The principle is the same as for 
1345 \ref pf_routing_tag_asroute "ASroute": The route contains a list of links that
1346 provide a path from \c src to \c dst. Here, \c src and \c dst can both be either a 
1347 \ref pf_host "host" or \ref pf_router "router".  This is mostly useful for the 
1348 \ref pf_routing_model_full "Full routing model" as well as for the 
1349 \ref pf_routing_model_shortest_path "shortest-paths" based models (as they require 
1350 topological information).
1351
1352
1353 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                 | Description                                                                                        |
1354 | --------------- | --------- | ---------------------- | -----------                                                                                        |
1355 | src             | yes       | String                 | The value given to the source's "id" attribute                                                     |
1356 | dst             | yes       | String                 | The value given to the destination's "id" attribute.                                               |
1357 | symmetrical     | no        | YES\| NO (Default: YES) | If this route is symmetric, the opposite route (from dst to src) will also be declared implicitly. |
1358
1359
1360 #### Examples ####
1361
1362 A route in the \ref pf_routing_model_full "Full routing model" could look like this:
1363 \verbatim
1364  <route src="Tremblay" dst="Bourassa">
1365      <link_ctn id="4"/><link_ctn id="3"/><link_ctn id="2"/><link_ctn id="0"/><link_ctn id="1"/><link_ctn id="6"/><link_ctn id="7"/>
1366  </route>
1367 \endverbatim
1368
1369 A route in the \ref pf_routing_model_shortest_path "Shortest-Path routing model" could look like this:
1370 \verbatim
1371 <route src="Tremblay" dst="Bourassa">
1372   <link_ctn id="3"/>
1373 </route>
1374 \endverbatim
1375 \note 
1376     You must only have one link in your routes when you're using them to provide
1377     topological information, as the routes here are simply the edges of the
1378     (network-)graph and the employed algorithms need to know which edge connects
1379     which pair of entities.
1380
1381 \subsubsection pf_routing_tag_bypassasroute bypassASroute
1382
1383 %As said before, once you choose
1384 a model, it (most likely; the constant network model, for example, doesn't) calculates routes for you. But maybe you want to
1385 define some of your routes, which will be specific. You may also want
1386 to bypass some routes defined in lower level AS at an upper stage:
1387 <b>bypassASroute</b> is the tag you're looking for. It allows to
1388 bypass routes defined between already defined between AS (if you want
1389 to bypass route for a specific host, you should just use byPassRoute).
1390 The principle is the same as ASroute : <b>bypassASroute</b> contains
1391 list of links that are in the path between src and dst.
1392
1393 #### Attributes ####
1394
1395 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                  | Description                                                                                                  |
1396 | --------------- | --------- | ----------------------  | -----------                                                                                                  |
1397 | src             | yes       | String                  | The value given to the source AS's "id" attribute                                                            |
1398 | dst             | yes       | String                  | The value given to the destination AS's "id" attribute.                                                      |
1399 | gw_src          | yes       | String                  | The value given to the source gateway's "id" attribute; this can be any host or router within the src AS     |
1400 | gw_dst          | yes       | String                  | The value given to the destination gateway's "id" attribute; this can be any host or router within the dst AS|
1401 | symmetrical     | no        | YES\| NO (Default: YES) | If this route is symmetric, the opposite route (from dst to src) will also be declared implicitly. |
1402
1403 #### Example ####
1404
1405 \verbatim
1406 <bypassASRoute src="my_cluster_1" dst="my_cluster_2"
1407   gw_src="my_cluster_1_router"
1408   gw_dst="my_cluster_2_router">
1409     <link_ctn id="link_tmp"/>
1410 </bypassASroute>
1411 \endverbatim
1412
1413 This example shows that link \c link_tmp (definition not displayed here) directly
1414 connects the router \c my_cluster_1_router in the source cluster to the router
1415 \c my_cluster_2_router in the destination router. Additionally, as the \c symmetrical
1416 attribute was not given, this route is presumed to be symmetrical.
1417
1418 \subsubsection pf_routing_tag_bypassroute bypassRoute
1419
1420 %As said before, once you choose
1421 a model, it (most likely; the constant network model, for example, doesn't) calculates routes for you. But maybe you want to
1422 define some of your routes, which will be specific. You may also want
1423 to bypass some routes defined in lower level AS at an upper stage :
1424 <b>bypassRoute</b> is the tag you're looking for. It allows to bypass
1425 routes defined between <b>host/router</b>. The principle is the same
1426 as route : <b>bypassRoute</b> contains list of links references of
1427 links that are in the path between src and dst.
1428
1429 #### Attributes ####
1430
1431 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                  | Description                                                                                                  |
1432 | --------------- | --------- | ----------------------  | -----------                                                                                                  |
1433 | src             | yes       | String                  | The value given to the source AS's "id" attribute                                                            |
1434 | dst             | yes       | String                  | The value given to the destination AS's "id" attribute.                                                      |
1435 | symmetrical     | no        | YES \| NO (Default: YES) | If this route is symmetric, the opposite route (from dst to src) will also be declared implicitly. |
1436
1437 #### Examples ####
1438
1439 \verbatim
1440 <bypassRoute src="host_1" dst="host_2">
1441    <link_ctn id="link_tmp"/>
1442 </bypassRoute>
1443 \endverbatim
1444
1445 This example shows that link \c link_tmp (definition not displayed here) directly
1446 connects host \c host_1 to host \c host_2. Additionally, as the \c symmetrical
1447 attribute was not given, this route is presumed to be symmetrical.
1448
1449 \subsection pb_baroex Basic Routing Example
1450
1451 Let's say you have an AS named AS_Big that contains two other AS, AS_1
1452 and AS_2. If you want to make a host (h1) from AS_1 with another one
1453 (h2) from AS_2 then you'll have to proceed as follows:
1454 \li First, you have to ensure that a route is defined from h1 to the
1455     AS_1's exit gateway and from h2 to AS_2's exit gateway.
1456 \li Then, you'll have to define a route between AS_1 to AS_2. %As those
1457     AS are both resources belonging to AS_Big, then it has to be done
1458     at AS_big level. To define such a route, you have to give the
1459     source AS (AS_1), the destination AS (AS_2), and their respective
1460     gateway (as the route is effectively defined between those two
1461     entry/exit points). Elements of this route can only be elements
1462     belonging to AS_Big, so links and routers in this route should be
1463     defined inside AS_Big. If you choose some shortest-path model,
1464     this route will be computed automatically.
1465
1466 %As said before, there are mainly 2 tags for routing :
1467 \li <b>ASroute</b>: to define routes between two  <b>AS</b>
1468 \li <b>route</b>: to define routes between two <b>host/router</b>
1469
1470 %As we are dealing with routes between AS, it means that those we'll
1471 have some definition at AS_Big level. Let consider AS_1 contains 1
1472 host, 1 link and one router and AS_2 3 hosts, 4 links and one router.
1473 There will be a central router, and a cross-like topology. At the end
1474 of the crosses arms, you'll find the 3 hosts and the router that will
1475 act as a gateway. We have to define routes inside those two AS. Let
1476 say that AS_1 contains full routes, and AS_2 contains some Floyd
1477 routing (as we don't want to bother with defining all routes). %As
1478 we're using some shortest path algorithms to route into AS_2, we'll
1479 then have to define some <b>route</b> to gives some topological
1480 information to SimGrid. Here is a file doing it all :
1481
1482 \verbatim
1483 <AS  id="AS_Big"  routing="Dijsktra">
1484   <AS id="AS_1" routing="Full">
1485      <host id="AS_1_host1" power="1000000000"/>
1486      <link id="AS_1_link" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1487      <router id="AS_1_gateway"/>
1488      <route src="AS_1_host1" dst="AS_1_gateway">
1489             <link_ctn id="AS_1_link"/>
1490      </route>
1491   </AS>
1492   <AS id="AS_2" routing="Floyd">
1493      <host id="AS_2_host1" power="1000000000"/>
1494      <host id="AS_2_host2" power="1000000000"/>
1495      <host id="AS_2_host3" power="1000000000"/>
1496      <link id="AS_2_link1" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1497      <link id="AS_2_link2" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1498      <link id="AS_2_link3" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1499      <link id="AS_2_link4" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1500      <router id="central_router"/>
1501      <router id="AS_2_gateway"/>
1502      <!-- routes providing topological information -->
1503      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host1"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link1"/></route>
1504      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host2"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link2"/></route>
1505      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_host3"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link3"/></route>
1506      <route src="central_router" dst="AS_2_gateway"><link_ctn id="AS_2_link4"/></route>
1507   </AS>
1508     <link id="backbone" bandwidth="1250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1509
1510      <ASroute src="AS_1" dst="AS_2"
1511          gw_src="AS_1_gateway"
1512          gw_dst="AS_2_gateway">
1513                 <link_ctn id="backbone"/>
1514      </ASroute>
1515 </AS>
1516 \endverbatim
1517
1518 \section pf_other_tags Tags not (directly) describing the platform
1519
1520 There are 3 tags, that you can use inside a \<platform\> tag that are
1521 not describing the platform:
1522 \li \ref pf_random "random": it allows you to define random generators you want to use
1523     for your simulation.
1524 \li \ref pf_config "config": it allows you to pass some configuration stuff like, for
1525     example, the network model and so on. It follows the
1526 \li \ref pf_include "include": allows you to include another file into the current one.
1527
1528 \subsection pf_config config
1529
1530 The only purpose of this tag is to contain the \c prop tags, as described below.
1531 These tags will then configure the options as described by Section \ref options.
1532 (See the example)
1533
1534 #### Attributes ####
1535
1536 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                  | Description                                                                                                  |
1537 | --------------- | --------- | ----------------------  | -----------                                                                                                  |
1538 | id              | yes       | String                  | The identifier of the config tag when referring to id; this is basically useless, though.                    |
1539
1540 #### Possible children ####
1541
1542 Tag name        | Description | Documentation
1543 ------------    | ----------- | -------------
1544 \<prop/\>       | The prop tag allows you to define different configuration options following the attribute/value schema. See the \ref options page. | N/A
1545
1546 #### Example ####
1547
1548 \verbatim
1549 <?xml version='1.0'?>
1550 <!DOCTYPE platform SYSTEM "http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd">
1551 <platform version="3">
1552 <config id="General">
1553         <prop id="maxmin/precision" value="0.000010"></prop>
1554         <prop id="cpu/optim" value="TI"></prop>
1555         <prop id="host/model" value="compound"></prop>
1556         <prop id="network/model" value="SMPI"></prop>
1557         <prop id="path" value="~/"></prop>
1558         <prop id="smpi/bw_factor" value="65472:0.940694;15424:0.697866;9376:0.58729"></prop>
1559 </config>
1560
1561 <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Full">
1562 ...
1563 \endverbatim
1564
1565
1566 \subsection pf_random random
1567
1568 <b>This has not yet been implemented.</b>
1569
1570 \subsection pf_include include
1571
1572 The \c include tag allows you to import other platforms into your
1573 local file. This is done with the intention to help people
1574 combine their different AS and provide new platforms. Those files
1575 should contain XML that consists of 
1576 \ref pf_include "include", \ref pf_cluster "cluster", \ref pf_peer "peer", \ref pf_As "AS", \ref pf_trace "trace", \ref pf_trace "tags".
1577
1578 \note
1579     Due to some obscure technical reasons, you have to open
1580     and close the tag in order to make it work.
1581
1582 #### Attributes ####
1583
1584 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                  | Description                                                                                                  |
1585 | --------------- | --------- | ----------------------  | -----------                                                                                                  |
1586 | file            | yes       | String                  | Filename of the path you want to include with either relative or absolute path. Syntax is defined by your OS |
1587
1588
1589 #### Example ####
1590
1591 The following example includes two files, clusterA.xml and clusterB.xml and
1592 combines them two one platform file; all hosts, routers etc. defined in 
1593 each of them will then be usable.
1594
1595 \verbatim
1596 <?xml version='1.0'?>
1597 <!DOCTYPE platform SYSTEM "http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd">
1598 <platform version="3">
1599         <AS id="main" routing="Full">
1600                 <include file="clusterA.xml"></include>
1601                 <include file="clusterB.xml"></include>
1602         </AS>
1603 </platform>
1604 \endverbatim
1605
1606 \subsection pf_trace trace and trace_connect
1607
1608 Both tags are an alternate way to pass files containing information on
1609 availability, state etc. to an entity. (See also, for instance, Section \ref
1610 pf_host_churn "Churn", as described for the host entity.) Instead of referring
1611 to the file directly in the host, link, or cluster tag, you proceed by defining
1612 a trace with an id corresponding to a file, later a host/link/cluster, and
1613 finally using trace_connect you say that the file trace must be used by the
1614 entity. 
1615
1616
1617 #### Example #### 
1618
1619 \verbatim
1620 <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Full">
1621   <host id="bob" power="1000000000"/>
1622 </AS>
1623 <trace id="myTrace" file="bob.trace" periodicity="1.0"/>
1624 <trace_connect trace="myTrace" element="bob" kind="POWER"/>
1625 \endverbatim
1626
1627 \note 
1628     The order here is important.  \c trace_connect must come 
1629     after the elements \c trace and \c host, as both the host
1630     and the trace definition must be known when \c trace_connect
1631     is parsed; the order of \c trace and \c host is arbitrary.
1632
1633
1634 #### \c trace attributes ####
1635
1636
1637 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                 | Description                                                                                       |
1638 | --------------- | --------- | ---------------------- | -----------                                                                                       |
1639 | id              | yes       | String                 | Identifier of this trace; this is the name you pass on to \c trace_connect.                       |
1640 | file            | no        | String                 | Filename of the file that contains the information - the path must follow the style of your OS. You can omit this, but then you must specifiy the values inside of &lt;trace&gt; and &lt;/trace&gt; - see the example below. |
1641 | trace_periodicity | yes | String | This is the same as for \ref pf_host "hosts" (see there for details) |
1642
1643 Here is an example  of trace when no file name is provided:
1644
1645 \verbatim
1646  <trace id="myTrace" periodicity="1.0">
1647     0.0 1.0
1648     11.0 0.5
1649     20.0 0.8
1650  </trace>
1651 \endverbatim
1652
1653 #### \c trace_connect attributes ####
1654
1655 | Attribute name  | Mandatory | Values                 | Description                                                                                       |
1656 | --------------- | --------- | ---------------------- | -----------                                                                                       |
1657 | kind            | no        | HOST_AVAIL\|POWER\|<br/>LINK_AVAIL\|BANDWIDTH\|LATENCY (Default: HOST_AVAIL)   | Describes the kind of trace.                   |
1658 | trace           | yes       | String                 | Identifier of the referenced trace (specified of the trace's \c id attribute)                     |
1659 | element         | yes       | String                 | The identifier of the referenced entity as given by its \c id attribute                           |
1660
1661 \section pf_hints Hints and tips, or how to write a platform efficiently
1662
1663 Now you should know at least the syntax and be able to create a
1664 platform by your own. However, after having ourselves wrote some platforms, there
1665 are some best practices you should pay attention to in order to
1666 produce good platform and some choices you can make in order to have
1667 faster simulations. Here's some hints and tips, then.
1668
1669 \subsection pf_as_h AS Hierarchy
1670 The AS design allows SimGrid to go fast, because computing route is
1671 done only for the set of resources defined in this AS. If you're using
1672 only a big AS containing all resource with no AS into it and you're
1673 using Full model, then ... you'll loose all interest into it. On the
1674 other hand, designing a binary tree of AS with, at the lower level,
1675 only one host, then you'll also loose all the good AS hierarchy can
1676 give you. Remind you should always be "reasonable" in your platform
1677 definition when choosing the hierarchy. A good choice if you try to
1678 describe a real life platform is to follow the AS described in
1679 reality, since this kind of trade-off works well for real life
1680 platforms.
1681
1682 \subsection pf_exit_as Exit AS: why and how
1683 Users that have looked at some of our platforms may have notice a
1684 non-intuitive schema ... Something like that :
1685
1686
1687 \verbatim
1688 <AS id="AS_4"  routing="Full">
1689 <AS id="exitAS_4"  routing="Full">
1690         <router id="router_4"/>
1691 </AS>
1692 <cluster id="cl_4_1" prefix="c_4_1-" suffix="" radical="1-20" power="1000000000" bw="125000000" lat="5E-5" bb_bw="2250000000" bb_lat="5E-4"/>
1693 <cluster id="cl_4_2" prefix="c_4_2-" suffix="" radical="1-20" power="1000000000" bw="125000000" lat="5E-5" bb_bw="2250000000" bb_lat="5E-4"/>
1694 <link id="4_1" bandwidth="2250000000" latency="5E-5"/>
1695 <link id="4_2" bandwidth="2250000000" latency="5E-5"/>
1696 <link id="bb_4" bandwidth="2250000000" latency="5E-4"/>
1697 <ASroute src="cl_4_1"
1698         dst="cl_4_2"
1699         gw_src="c_4_1-cl_4_1_router"
1700         gw_dst="c_4_2-cl_4_2_router"
1701         symmetrical="YES">
1702                 <link_ctn id="4_1"/>
1703                 <link_ctn id="bb_4"/>
1704                 <link_ctn id="4_2"/>
1705 </ASroute>
1706 <ASroute src="cl_4_1"
1707         dst="exitAS_4"
1708         gw_src="c_4_1-cl_4_1_router"
1709         gw_dst="router_4"
1710         symmetrical="YES">
1711                 <link_ctn id="4_1"/>
1712                 <link_ctn id="bb_4"/>
1713 </ASroute>
1714 <ASroute src="cl_4_2"
1715         dst="exitAS_4"
1716         gw_src="c_4_2-cl_4_2_router"
1717         gw_dst="router_4"
1718         symmetrical="YES">
1719                 <link_ctn id="4_2"/>
1720                 <link_ctn id="bb_4"/>
1721 </ASroute>
1722 </AS>
1723 \endverbatim
1724
1725 In the AS_4, you have an exitAS_4 defined, containing only one router,
1726 and routes defined to that AS from all other AS (as cluster is only a
1727 shortcut for an AS, see cluster description for details). If there was
1728 an upper AS, it would define routes to and from AS_4 with the gateway
1729 router_4. It's just because, as we did not allowed (for performances
1730 issues) to have routes from an AS to a single host/router, you have to
1731 enclose your gateway, when you have AS included in your AS, within an
1732 AS to define routes to it.
1733
1734 \subsection pf_P2P_tags P2P or how to use coordinates
1735 SimGrid allows you to use some coordinated-based system, like vivaldi,
1736 to describe a platform. The main concept is that you have some peers
1737 that are located somewhere: this is the function of the
1738 <b>coordinates</b> of the \<peer\> or \<host\> tag. There's nothing
1739 complicated in using it, here is an example of it:
1740
1741 \verbatim
1742 <?xml version='1.0'?>
1743 <!DOCTYPE platform SYSTEM "http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd">
1744 <platform version="3">
1745
1746 <config id="General">
1747         <prop id="network/coordinates" value="yes"></prop>
1748 </config>
1749  <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Vivaldi">
1750         <host id="100030591" coordinates="25.5 9.4 1.4" power="1500000000.0" />
1751         <host id="100036570" coordinates="-12.7 -9.9 2.1" power="730000000.0" />
1752         ...
1753         <host id="100429957" coordinates="17.5 6.7 18.8" power="830000000.0" />
1754         </AS>
1755 </platform>
1756 \endverbatim
1757
1758 Coordinates are then used to calculate latency between two hosts by
1759 calculating the euclidean distance between the two hosts coordinates.
1760 The results express the latency in ms.
1761
1762 Note that the previous example defines a routing directly between hosts but it could be also used to define a routing between AS.
1763 That is for example what is commonly done when using peers (see Section \ref pf_peer).
1764 \verbatim
1765 <?xml version='1.0'?>
1766 <!DOCTYPE platform SYSTEM "http://simgrid.gforge.inria.fr/simgrid.dtd">
1767 <platform version="3">
1768
1769 <config id="General">
1770         <prop id="network/coordinates" value="yes"></prop>
1771 </config>
1772  <AS  id="AS0"  routing="Vivaldi">
1773    <peer id="peer-0" coordinates="173.0 96.8 0.1" power="730Mf" bw_in="13.38MBps" bw_out="1.024MBps" lat="500us"/>
1774    <peer id="peer-1" coordinates="247.0 57.3 0.6" power="730Mf" bw_in="13.38MBps" bw_out="1.024MBps" lat="500us" />
1775    <peer id="peer-2" coordinates="243.4 58.8 1.4" power="730Mf" bw_in="13.38MBps" bw_out="1.024MBps" lat="500us" />
1776 </AS>
1777 </platform>
1778 \endverbatim
1779 In such a case though, we connect the AS created by the <b>peer</b> tag with the Vivaldi routing mechanism.
1780 This means that to route between AS1 and AS2, it will use the coordinates of router_AS1 and router_AS2.
1781 This is currently a convention and we may offer to change this convention in the DTD later if needed.
1782 You may have noted that conveniently, a peer named FOO defines an AS named FOO and a router named router_FOO, which is why it works seamlessly with the <b>peer</b> tag.
1783
1784
1785 \subsection pf_routing_howto_choose_wisely Choosing wisely the routing model to use
1786
1787
1788 Choosing wisely the routing model to use can significantly fasten your
1789 simulation/save your time when writing the platform/save tremendous
1790 disk space. Here is the list of available model and their
1791 characteristics (lookup : time to resolve a route):
1792
1793 \li <b>Full</b>: Full routing data (fast, large memory requirements,
1794     fully expressive)
1795 \li <b>Floyd</b>: Floyd routing data (slow initialization, fast
1796     lookup, lesser memory requirements, shortest path routing only).
1797     Calculates all routes at once at the beginning.
1798 \li <b>Dijkstra</b>: Dijkstra routing data (fast initialization, slow
1799     lookup, small memory requirements, shortest path routing only).
1800     Calculates a route when necessary.
1801 \li <b>DijkstraCache</b>: Dijkstra routing data (fast initialization,
1802     fast lookup, small memory requirements, shortest path routing
1803     only). Same as Dijkstra, except it handles a cache for latest used
1804     routes.
1805 \li <b>None</b>: No routing (usable with Constant network only).
1806     Defines that there is no routes, so if you try to determine a
1807     route without constant network within this AS, SimGrid will raise
1808     an exception.
1809 \li <b>Vivaldi</b>: Vivaldi routing, so when you want to use coordinates
1810 \li <b>Cluster</b>: Cluster routing, specific to cluster tag, should
1811     not be used.
1812
1813 \subsection pf_switch Hey, I want to describe a switch but there is no switch tag !
1814
1815 Actually we did not include switch tag, ok. But when you're trying to
1816 simulate a switch, the only major impact it has when you're using
1817 fluid model (and SimGrid uses fluid model unless you activate 
1818 ns-3 or constant network mode) is the impact of the upper limit of
1819 the switch motherboard speed that will eventually be reached if you're
1820 using intensively your switch. So, the switch impact is similar to a
1821 link one. That's why we are used to describe a switch using a link tag
1822 (as a link is not an edge by a hyperedge, you can connect more than 2
1823 other links to it).
1824
1825 \subsection pf_platform_multipath How to express multipath routing in platform files?
1826
1827 It is unfortunately impossible to express the fact that there is more
1828 than one routing path between two given hosts. Let's consider the
1829 following platform file:
1830
1831 \verbatim
1832 <route src="A" dst="B">
1833    <link_ctn id="1"/>
1834 </route>
1835 <route src="B" dst="C">
1836   <link_ctn id="2"/>
1837 </route>
1838 <route src="A" dst="C">
1839   <link_ctn id="3"/>
1840 </route>
1841 \endverbatim
1842
1843 Although it is perfectly valid, it does not mean that data traveling
1844 from A to C can either go directly (using link 3) or through B (using
1845 links 1 and 2). It simply means that the routing on the graph is not
1846 trivial, and that data do not following the shortest path in number of
1847 hops on this graph. Another way to say it is that there is no implicit
1848 in these routing descriptions. The system will only use the routes you
1849 declare (such as &lt;route src="A" dst="C"&gt;&lt;link_ctn
1850 id="3"/&gt;&lt;/route&gt;), without trying to build new routes by aggregating
1851 the provided ones.
1852
1853 You are also free to declare platform where the routing is not
1854 symmetric. For example, add the following to the previous file:
1855
1856 \verbatim
1857 <route src="C" dst="A">
1858   <link_ctn id="2"/>
1859   <link_ctn id="1"/>
1860 </route>
1861 \endverbatim
1862
1863 This makes sure that data from C to A go through B where data from A
1864 to C go directly. Don't worry about realism of such settings since
1865 we've seen ways more weird situation in real settings (in fact, that's
1866 the realism of very regular platforms which is questionable, but
1867 that's another story).
1868
1869 \section pf_flexml_bypassing Bypassing the XML parser with your own C functions
1870 <b>NOTE THAT THIS DOCUMENTATION, WHILE STILL WORKING, IS STRONGLY DEPRECATED</b>
1871
1872 So you want to bypass the XML files parser, uh? Maybe doing some parameter
1873 sweep experiments on your simulations or so? This is possible, and
1874 it's not even really difficult (well. Such a brutal idea could be
1875 harder to implement). Here is how it goes.
1876
1877 For this, you have to first remember that the XML parsing in SimGrid is done
1878 using a tool called FleXML. Given a DTD, this gives a flex-based parser. If
1879 you want to bypass the parser, you need to provide some code mimicking what
1880 it does and replacing it in its interactions with the SURF code. So, let's
1881 have a look at these interactions.
1882
1883 FleXML parser are close to classical SAX parsers. It means that a
1884 well-formed SimGrid platform XML file might result in the following
1885 "events":
1886
1887   - start "platform_description" with attribute version="2"
1888   - start "host" with attributes id="host1" power="1.0"
1889   - end "host"
1890   - start "host" with attributes id="host2" power="2.0"
1891   - end "host"
1892   - start "link" with ...
1893   - end "link"
1894   - start "route" with ...
1895   - start "link_ctn" with ...
1896   - end "link_ctn"
1897   - end "route"
1898   - end "platform_description"
1899
1900 The communication from the parser to the SURF code uses two means:
1901 Attributes get copied into some global variables, and a surf-provided
1902 function gets called by the parser for each event. For example, the event
1903   - start "host" with attributes id="host1" power="1.0"
1904
1905 let the parser do something roughly equivalent to:
1906 \verbatim
1907   strcpy(A_host_id,"host1");
1908   A_host_power = 1.0;
1909   STag_host();
1910 \endverbatim
1911
1912 In SURF, we attach callbacks to the different events by initializing the
1913 pointer functions to some the right surf functions. Since there can be
1914 more than one callback attached to the same event (if more than one
1915 model is in use, for example), they are stored in a dynar. Example in
1916 host_ptask_L07.c:
1917 \verbatim
1918   /* Adding callback functions */
1919   surf_parse_reset_parser();
1920   surfxml_add_callback(STag_surfxml_host_cb_list, &parse_cpu_init);
1921   surfxml_add_callback(STag_surfxml_prop_cb_list, &parse_properties);
1922   surfxml_add_callback(STag_surfxml_link_cb_list, &parse_link_init);
1923   surfxml_add_callback(STag_surfxml_route_cb_list, &parse_route_set_endpoints);
1924   surfxml_add_callback(ETag_surfxml_link_c_ctn_cb_list, &parse_route_elem);
1925   surfxml_add_callback(ETag_surfxml_route_cb_list, &parse_route_set_route);
1926
1927   /* Parse the file */
1928   surf_parse_open(file);
1929   xbt_assert(!surf_parse(), "Parse error in %s", file);
1930   surf_parse_close();
1931 \endverbatim
1932
1933 So, to bypass the FleXML parser, you need to write your own version of the
1934 surf_parse function, which should do the following:
1935    - Fill the A_<tag>_<attribute> variables with the wanted values
1936    - Call the corresponding STag_<tag>_fun function to simulate tag start
1937    - Call the corresponding ETag_<tag>_fun function to simulate tag end
1938    - (do the same for the next set of values, and loop)
1939
1940 Then, tell SimGrid that you want to use your own "parser" instead of the stock one:
1941 \verbatim
1942   surf_parse = surf_parse_bypass_environment;
1943   MSG_create_environment(NULL);
1944   surf_parse = surf_parse_bypass_application;
1945   MSG_launch_application(NULL);
1946 \endverbatim
1947
1948 A set of macros are provided at the end of
1949 include/surf/surfxml_parse.h to ease the writing of the bypass
1950 functions. An example of this trick is distributed in the file
1951 examples/msg/masterslave/masterslave_bypass.c
1952
1953
1954 */